TEAP 2019: TAGUNG EXPERIMENTELL ARBEITENDER PSYCHOLOGEN
PROGRAM

Days: Monday, April 15th Tuesday, April 16th Wednesday, April 17th

Monday, April 15th

View this program: with abstractssession overviewtalk overview

09:00-11:00 Session 1A: Meta-Cognition (Symposium)

Meta-Cognition (Symposium)

Metacognition – monitoring and controlling one’s own cognitions – is among the most fascinating abilities of the human mind. In recent years, metacognition has received considerable attention in experimental psychology. This symposium presents new findings from this intriguing field of research. In the first talk, Zawadzka and Hanczakowski examine how metacognitive monitoring during repeated study trials benefits learning. In the second talk, Zimdahl and Undorf report research showing that knowledge about retrieval success and failure biases metamemory judgments. The following two talks address social aspects of metacognitive monitoring and control. Undorf presents work indicating that judgments about other persons’ memories are similar to judgments about one’s own memory in that both rely on nonanalytical, experience-based processes. Kuhlmann reports experiments showing that the ability to generate helpful memory cues for oneself is spared from aging, whereas the ability to generate memory cues in order to help other persons to remember is impaired in older age. Finally, Rouault, Dayan, and Fleming report behavioral and neuroimaging data indicating that confidence in single decisions supports the formation of global self-performance estimates. Taken together, the five talks of the symposium offer an up-to-date overview of current research in metacognition.

Chairs:
Beatrice G. Kuhlmann (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Monika Undorf (University of Mannheim, Germany)
09:00
Katarzyna Zawadzka (SWPS University, Poland)
Maciej Hanczakowski (SWPS University, Poland)
Metacognition (1) (abstract)
09:20
Malte F. Zimdahl (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Monika Undorf (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Metacognition (2) (abstract)
09:40
Monika Undorf (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Metacognition (3) (abstract)
10:00
Beatrice G. Kuhlmann (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Metacognition (4) (abstract)
10:20
Marion Rouault (Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, University College London, London, UK, UK)
Peter Dayan (Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, Germany)
Stephen Fleming (Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, University College London, London, UK, UK)
Metacognition (5) (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 1B: Psychophysiological Correlates of Effort-related Processes (Symposium)

Psychophysiological Correlates of Effort-related Processes (Symposium)

Recent decades have shown increased interest in physiological measures reflecting effort-related psychological processes. This symposium combines six presentations that showcase the variety of examined topics and employed measures in the field. The first two presentations will elaborate on the association between physiological and behavioural measures of effort. Capa will present research examining behavioural and physiological adaptations to changes in mental workload showing that the association between pre-ejection period and cognitive performance varies as a function of task demand. Bijleveld will then discuss the relationship between feelings of effort and physiological correlates of effort presenting data that reveal a dissociation between task demand-induced changes in self-reported effort and changes in pupil dilation. The following presentations will present applications of motivational intensity theory’s effort-related predictions to different psychological phenomena. Gendolla will elaborate on boundary conditions of implicit priming on effort showing that briefly presented affective pictures only affect effort-related cardiovascular activity if they are processed in an achievement context and without explicit awareness. Lasauskaite will present a study that highlights the impact of light conditions on effort-related sympathetic activity showing that cold, blue light results in weaker pre-ejection period response than warm, red light. Richter will compare two conflicting predictions about the impact of the implicit achievement motive on effort presenting findings that demonstrate that its impact on effort varies as a function of the clarity of task demand. Slade will discuss an application of motivational intensity theory to listening presenting results that suggest that pre-ejection period reactivity reflects listening demand.

Chair:
Michael Richter (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)
Location: GC1-08
09:00
Capa (Federal University of Toulouse, INU Champollion, France)
Richter (Liverpool John Moores Unviersity, UK)
Bijleveld (Behavioural Science Institute at Radboud University, Netherlands)
Gendolla (Université, Switzerland)
Lasauskaite (Université, Switzerland)
Psychophysiological correlates of effort-related processes - 1 (abstract)
09:20
Erik Bijleveld (Radboud University, Netherlands)
Psychophysiological correlates of effort-related processes - 2 (abstract)
09:40
Guido Gendolla (University of Geneva, Switzerland)
David Framorando (University of Geneva, Switzerland)
Psychophysiological correlates of effort-related processes - 3 (abstract)
10:00
Ruta Lasauskaite (Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Switzerland)
Michael Richter (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)
Christian Cajochen (Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Switzerland)
'Psychophysiological correlates of effort-related processes - 4 (abstract)
10:20
Michael Richter (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)
Florence Mazeres (University of Geneva, Switzerland)
Kerstin Brinkmann (University of Geneva, Switzerland)
Psychophysiological correlates of effort-related processes - 5 (abstract)
10:40
Kate Slade (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)
Michael Richter (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)
Psychophysiological correlates of effort-related processes - 6 (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 1C: Priming (Individual Talks)

Priming (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Michaela Rohr (Saarland University, Germany)
Location: TM1-06
09:00
Imke Marilla Gillich (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Thomas Jacobsen (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Mike Wendt (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Independent effects of distractor-target SOA and proportion congruency (abstract)
09:20
Michaela Rohr (Saarland University, Germany)
Dirk Wentura (Saarland University, Germany)
Priming the specific emotion category with individually selected nouns: Evidence for fast processing of emotional connotations (abstract)
09:40
Anton Öttl (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway)
Dawn M. Behne (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway)
Pascal Gygax (University of Fribourg, Switzerland)
Jukka Hyönä (University of Turku, Finland)
Ute Gabriel (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway)
Word-to-image priming of gender information: Beyond binary response designs (abstract)
10:00
Nicholas Lange (University of Plymouth, UK)
Christopher J. Berry (University of Plymouth, UK)
Timothy J. Hollins (University of Plymouth, UK)
Investigating the role of recognition in the association of priming and source memory (abstract)
10:20
Timea Folyi (Saarland University, Germany)
Michaela Rohr (Saarland University, Germany)
Dirk Wentura (Saarland University, Germany)
Emotion-specific cross-modal priming with brief prime duration and stimulus onset asynchronies: Testing the cross-modal integration account (abstract)
10:40
Johanna Bogon (Universität Regensburg, Germany)
Katrin Köllnberger (Universität Regensburg, Germany)
Roland Thomaschke (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany)
Gesine Dreisbach (Universität Regensburg, Germany)
Binding Time: Integration of response duration into event files (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 1D: Perception (Individual Talks)

Perception (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Lynn Huestegge (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Location: TM2-02
09:00
Christian Kaernbach (Institut für Psychologie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany, Germany)
Anna Marie Ulrich (Institut für Psychologie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany, Germany)
Jabin Kanczok (Institut für Psychologie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany, Germany)
Maximilian Brütt (Institut für Psychologie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany, Germany)
Thorsten Bartsch (Klinik für Neurologie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Germany)
Visual sensory pattern separation and completion (abstract)
09:20
Markus Conci (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Hermann J. Müller (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Siyi Chen (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Completion of parts into whole objects: Surface and contour grouping in Kanizsa figures (abstract)
09:40
Constantin Schmidts (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Anna Foerster (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Wilfried Kunde (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Proactive Control of Affective Distraction: Experience-Based but Not Expectancy-Based (abstract)
10:00
Helene Kreysa (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany)
Dorothee Scheffel (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany)
Carolin S. Altmann (University Hospital Jena, Germany)
Romi Zäske (Friedrich Schiller University Jena; University Hospital Jena, Germany)
Stefan R. Schweinberger (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany)
Multimodal effects of differentially attractive faces and voices on rating scores and pupil dilation (abstract)
10:20
Anna Eiserbeck (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Alexander Enge (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Rasha Abdel Rahman (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Investigating effects of person knowledge and facial trustworthiness on the access to visual awareness (abstract)
10:40
Annekathrin Schacht (University of Goettingen, Affective Neuroscience and Psychophysiology Laboratory, Germany)
Wiebke Hammerschmidt (University of Goettingen, Affective Neuroscience and Psychophysiology Laboratory, Germany)
Louisa Kulke (University of Goettingen, Affective Neuroscience and Psychophysiology Laboratory, Germany)
Igor Kagan (German Primate Center (DPZ), Decision and Awareness Group, Germany)
Implicit reward associations impact face processing: Time-resolved evidence from event-related brain potentials and pupil dilations (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 1E: Executive Function: Multi-Tasking (Individual Talks)

Executive Function: Multi-Tasking (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Michèle Muhmenthaler (University of Bern, Switzerland)
Location: BPLG-02
09:00
Michèle Muhmenthaler (University of Bern, Switzerland)
Beat Meier (University of Bern, Switzerland)
Different impact of task switching and response compatibility on long-term memory (abstract)
09:20
Mareike Hoffmann (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Iring Koch (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Lynn Huestegge (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Lack of oculomotor dominance while switching among effector systems? (abstract)
09:40
Jovita Brüning (TU Berlin, Germany)
Marie Mückstein (TU Berlin, Germany)
Dietrich Manzey (TU Berlin, Germany)
Task Organization in Multitasking – Impact of Lowered Between-Task Resource Competition on the Efficiency of Response Strategies in Free Concurrent Dual-Tasking (abstract)
10:00
Erik Friedgen (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Iring Koch (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Denise Nadine Stephan (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Effects of Postural Control in Multitasking (abstract)
10:20
Aleks Pieczykolan (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Lynn Huestegge (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Resource distribution in cross-modal action – challenging the view of separate resource pools for effector systems in multitasking (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 1F: Decision-Making 1 (Individual Talks)

Decision-Making 1 (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Momme von Sydow (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Muenchen, Germany)
Location: GCG-08
09:00
Momme von Sydow (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Muenchen, Germany)
Christoph Merdes (Zentralinstitut für Wissenschaftsreflexion und Schlüsselqualifikationen, FAU, Germany)
Ulrike Hahn (Birkbeck, University of London, UK)
Belief-Based Assessment of the Reliability of Sources – Light at the End of the Tunnel? (abstract)
09:20
Anne Schlottmann (University College London, UK)
Improving Children's Understanding of How Substances Mix through Taste Experience and Analogy (abstract)
09:40
Mario Herberz (University of Geneva, Switzerland)
Ulf Hahnel (University of Geneva, Switzerland)
Tobias Brosch (Univeristy of Geneva, Switzerland)
Unit familiarity leads to higher sensitivity to attribute differences: An application to attribute translation of car consumption (abstract)
10:00
Marko Tesic (Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London, UK)
Alice Liefgreen (Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, UK)
David Lagnado (Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, UK)
Explaining away: probability interpretations and diagnostic reasoning (abstract)
10:20
Franziska Bott (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Thorsten Meiser (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Decision Making Based on Pseudocontingencies – A Matter of Information Sampling (abstract)
10:40
David Huegli (School for Applied Psychology, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Switzerland)
Sarah Merks (School for Applied Psychology, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Switzerland)
Adrian Schwaninger (School for Applied Psychology, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Switzerland)
Human-automation interaction in a simulated cabin baggage screening task with automated explosive detection (abstract)
11:30-13:00 Session 2: Prof David Shanks, UCL 'Testing your memory: The many consequences of retrieval on long-term learning and retention'

Welcome and Keynote Speaker

Liz Charman, Pro-Vice Chancellor, London Metropolitan University
Welcome address

Hans-Peter Langfeldt, Goethe University Frankfurt
60 Years of TEAP - In Memoriam Heinrich Dueker

Chair:
Chris Lange-Kuettner (London Metropolitan University, UK)
14:00-16:00 Session 3A: POSTER SESSIONS: Perception and (Working) Memory

POSTER SESSIONS: Perception and (Working) Memory

Location: BPLG-01
14:00
Sebastian Mach (Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany)
Marisa Roßner (Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany)
Franziska Schmalfuß (Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany)
Josef Krems (Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany)
I feel you – Tactile notifications via wearable devices in the industrial environment of the future (abstract)
14:00
Leif Johannsen (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Annika Kuck (Technical University of Munich, Germany)
Alan Wing (University of Birmingham, UK)
Attentional demands of postural state transitions in older adults: the benefit of preparatory cues (abstract)
14:00
Annika L. Klaffehn (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Roland Pfister (University of Würzburg, Germany)
David Dignath (University of Freiburg, Germany)
Andreas Kalckert (University of Reading Malaysia, Malaysia)
Wilfried Kunde (University of Würzburg, Germany)
How to lose a hand: The temporal structure of disembodiment (abstract)
14:00
Nandor Hajdu (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
Barnabas Szaszi (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
Balazs Aczel (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
Social, psychological and environmental factors influencing staircase use (abstract)
14:00
Martina Rieger (Private, Austria)
Stephan F. Dahm (Private, Austria)
Victoria K.E. Bart (Private, Austria)
Motor imagery of bimanual coordination in pianists and non-musicians (abstract)
14:00
Barbara E. Marschallek (Experimental Psychology Unit - Helmut Schmidt University/ University of the Federal Armed Forces, Germany)
Selina M. Weiler (Experimental Psychology Unit - Helmut Schmidt University/ University of the Federal Armed Forces, Germany)
Mona Jörg (Experimental Psychology Unit - Helmut Schmidt University/ University of the Federal Armed Forces, Germany)
Thomas Jacobsen (Experimental Psychology Unit - Helmut Schmidt University/ University of the Federal Armed Forces, Germany)
An inverse correlation between Need for Uniqueness (NfU-G) and Visual Aesthetic Sensitivity (VAST*) (abstract)
14:00
Felice Tavera (University of Cologne, Germany)
Hilde Haider (University of Cologne, Germany)
Prediction effects in the interaction of scene and object processing (abstract)
14:00
Frederic Göhringer (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Miriam Löhr-Limpens (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Thomas Schenk (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Size representation in the dorsal system seems to be less not more accurate than size representation in the ventral system (abstract)
14:00
Sebastian Burger (Adolf-Würth-Center for the History of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Germany)
Armin Stock (Adolf-Würth-Center for the History of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Germany)
The aesthetic impression of stereoscopic images (abstract)
14:00
Isabella Kreilinger (UMIT the health & life science university, Austria)
Stephanie Rösch (IWM Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien, Germany)
Silvia Pixner (UMIT the health & life science university, Austria)
Structured quantities like finger patterns or dots of dice are of relevance for arithmetics (abstract)
14:00
Ronja Mueller (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Sandra Utz (University of Bamberg, Germany)
Claus-Christian Carbon (University of Bamberg, Germany)
Tilo Strobach (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Face adaptation effects on local information (abstract)
14:00
Rebekka Schubert (TU Dresden, Germany)
Maarten Jung (TU Dresden, Germany)
Jens Helmert (TU Dresden, Germany)
Sebastian Pannasch (TU Dresden, Germany)
Size matters: Vergence movements are influenced by familiar size (abstract)
14:00
Gáspár Lukács (University of Vienna, Austria)
Claudia Kawai (University of Vienna, Austria)
Ulrich Ansorge (University of Vienna, Austria)
The influence of interstimulus-interval types in the response time-based Concealed Information Test (abstract)
14:00
Patricia Hirsch (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Iring Koch (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Activation of task representations at the global level of dual-task processing (abstract)
14:00
Lasse Pelzer (University of Cologne, Germany)
Hilde Prof. Dr. Haider (University of Cologne, Germany)
Robert Prof. Dr. Gaschler (University of Hagen, Germany)
Eva Röttger (University of Cologne, Germany)
Learning of across-task-contingencies modulates partial repetition costs in dual-tasking (abstract)
14:00
Miriam Löhr-Limpens (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Frederic Göhringer (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Thomas Schenk (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Constanze Hesse (University of Aberdeen, UK)
Grasping and perception are both affected by irrelevant information and secondary tasks: (abstract)
14:00
Felix Hekele (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Omar Jubran (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Jan Spilski (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Francisca Rodriguez (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Franca Alexandra Rupprecht (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Andreas Schneider (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Investigating the impact of visual and auditive task environments on cognitive load biomarkers (abstract)
14:00
Daniele Didino (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Christina Breil (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
André Knops (University Paris Descartes; CNRS UMR 8240, Laboratory for the Psychology of Child Development and Education, France)
The role of semantic processing and response latency in the SNARC effect (abstract)
14:00
Fang Zhao (University of Hagen, Germany)
Robert Gaschler (University of Hagen, Germany)
Olaf Nöhring (University of Hagen, Germany)
Eva Röttger (University of Cologne, Germany)
Hilde Haider (University of Cologne, Germany)
Conflict adaptation effect on n - 4 under dual-tasking (abstract)
14:00
Sara Laybourn (University of Munich - Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Germany)
Anne C. Frenzel (University of Munich - Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Germany)
“How can I not remember five colours? That makes me angry!” – Emotional Experiences during a Visual Working Memory Task (abstract)
14:00
Christina Weckwerth (FernUniversität Hagen - Allgemeine Psychologie - LME, Germany)
Anna Conci (FernUniversität Hagen - Allgemeine Psychologie - LME, Germany)
Robert Gaschler (FernUniversität Hagen - Allgemeine Psychologie - LME, Germany)
Visual search in x-rayed hand luggage not harmed by working memory load (abstract)
14:00
Maximilian Stefani (Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany)
Wolfgang Mack (Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany)
Marian Sauter (Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany)
Difficulty: Hard! What we can learn from triple-tasks (abstract)
14:00
Christoph Schütz (Bielefeld University, Germany)
Thomas Schack (Bielefeld University, Germany)
Disruption of spatial working memory performance depends on the fraction of motor re-planning (abstract)
14:00
Jan Göttmann (Ruprecht-Karls University Heidelberg, Germany)
Gidon Thomas Frischkorn (University of Zurich, Germany)
The Interrelation of Processing and Storage in Working Memory cannot be explained by Cognitive Load (abstract)
14:00
Juliane Scheil (Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Germany)
Thomas Kleinsorge (Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Germany)
Reduced n – 2 Repetition Costs by Inclusion of Task Repetitions are due to increased Task Shielding (abstract)
14:00
Anne Voormann (University of Freiburg, Germany)
Mikhail S. Spektor (University of Freiburg, Germany)
Karl Christoph Klauer (University of Freiburg, Germany)
Investigating paired-word recognition: A comparison of continuous and discrete-state models (abstract)
14:00
Markus Martini (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Pierre Sachse (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Wakeful resting and memory retention: Testing individual differences in children aged 13-14 years (abstract)
14:00
Alexandra Clausen (TU Darmstadt, Germany)
Florian Kattner (Technische Universität Darmstadt, University of Hamburg, Germany)
Revisiting the prioritization of emotional information in iconic memory: A pre-registered replication study (abstract)
14:00
Yannick Runge (University of Trier, Germany)
Christian Frings (University of Trier, Germany)
Tobias Tempel (Ludwigsburg University of Education, Germany)
Benefits of Memory Offloading for Subsequent Cognitive Performance (abstract)
14:00
Rory Spanton (University of Plymouth, UK)
Christopher Berry (University of Plymouth, UK)
The Unequal Variance Signal-Detection Model of Recognition Memory: Investigating the Encoding Variability Hypothesis (abstract)
14:00-16:00 Session 3B: POSTER SESSION: Emotion, Agency, and Learning

POSTER SESSION: Emotion, Agency, and Learning

Location: TMG 45
14:00
Beatrix Labadi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Emotion recognition in multiple persons situation (abstract)
14:00
Susana Ruiz Fernandez (FOM-Hochschule für Oekonomie und Management; Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien Tübingen, Germany)
Juan Jose Rahona (Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Germany)
Sergio Cervera Torres (Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Germany)
Martin Lachmair (Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Germany)
Hendrik Godbersen (FOM-Hochschule für Oekonomie und Management, Germany)
The Past Is in the Past but the Future Is Bright: Associating Positive Affects with the Future and Negative Affects with the Past (abstract)
14:00
Sarah Esser (University of Cologne, Germany)
Hilde Haider (University of Cologne, Germany)
Hedwig Eisenbarth (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Learning deficits in psychopathic individuals: A problem of attentional focus or emotion processing? (abstract)
14:00
Anna Dapprich (Radboud University, Netherlands)
Katinka von Borries (Radboud University, Netherlands)
Karin Roelofs (Radboud University, Netherlands)
Wolf-Gero Lange (Radboud University, Netherlands)
The Role of Social Anxiety, Psychopathic Tendencies and Hormones in Approach-Avoidance Behavior towards Emotional Faces (abstract)
14:00
Joanna Kisker (Osnabrück University, Germany)
Rebecca Sophia Sylvester (Osnabrück University, Germany)
Elise Leila Radtke (Osnabrück University, Germany)
Benjamin Schöne (Osnabrück University, Germany)
Thomas Gruber (Osnabrück University, Germany)
Library for Universal Virtual Realty Experiments: luVRe (abstract)
14:00
Sergio Cervera-Torres (Leibniz Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM)-Knowledge Media Research Center, Germany)
Susana Ruiz Fernández (FOM-Hochschule für Oekonomie und Management; Leibniz Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Germany)
Martin Lachmair (Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien; LEAD Graduate School &Research Network, University of Tübingen, Germany)
Matthias Riekert (Leibniz Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM)-Knowledge Media Research Center, Germany)
Peter Gerjets (Leibniz Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM)-Knowledge Media Research Center, Germany)
Altering emotions near the hand: Approach-Avoidance swipe interactions modulate emotional images judgments (abstract)
14:00
Carolin Schwab (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Anne Frenzel (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Elizabeth Mayer (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Discrete Emotions in Grading Situations: Differentiated Effects of Anger, Enjoyment, and Boredom on Grades (abstract)
14:00
Tina Braun (Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany)
Ute Kunzmann (Universität Leipzig, Germany)
Timo von Oertzen (Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany)
Children show a better empathic accuracy in the presence of their mentor (abstract)
14:00
Knut Drewing (Giessen University, Germany)
Emotional responses to touched materials in young female and male adults (abstract)
14:00
Irene Sophia Plank (Einstein Center for Neurosciences Berlin, Germany)
Lina-Nel Christiansen (Universität Potsdam, Germany)
Felix Bermpohl (Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany)
Understanding Children. Parents versus Non-Parents (abstract)
14:00
Sara Schmitz (Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim, Germany)
Johanna Hepp (Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim, Germany)
Inga Niedtfeld (Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim, Germany)
Negative affect, emotion processing and distrust – a Daily Life Study (abstract)
14:00
Simon Sanwald (Universität Ulm, Germany)
Christian Montag (Universität Ulm, Germany)
Markus Kiefer (Universität Ulm, Germany)
Depressive emotionality moderates the influence of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on unconscious semantic priming (abstract)
14:00
Johannes Großer (Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Germany)
Martina Bientzle (Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Germany)
Joachim Kimmerle (Institut für Wissensmedien (IWM), Germany)
Learning from digital educational videos: The impact of the source profession on attitude, expectation, and knowledge (abstract)
14:00
Hannah Schipperges (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany)
Zeliha Sahintürk (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany)
Marion Braun (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany)
Sonja Ehret (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany)
Miriam Ruess (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany)
Roland Thomaschke (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany)
Minimal art museums have restorative effects (abstract)
14:00
Luisa Prochazkova (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Roberta Sellaro (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Bernhard Hommel (Leiden University, Netherlands)
The effects of performance (Non-)contingent reward on metacontrol policies (abstract)
14:00
David Dignath (University Freiburg, Germany)
Robert Wirth (University Würzburg, Germany)
Jan Kühnhausen (University Tübingen, Germany)
Caterina Gawrilow (jan.kuehnhausen@uni-tuebingen.de, Germany)
Wilfried Kunde (Universiyt Würzburg, Germany)
Andrea Kiesel (University Freiburg, Germany)
Motivation drives conflict adaptation (abstract)
14:00
Lars König (University of Münster, Germany)
Developing Podcasts to Teach Psychology: Teacher Enthusiasm Increases Students’ Excitement, Interest, Enjoyment, and Learning Motivation (abstract)
14:00
Thomas Maran (University of Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein)
Simon Liegl (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Marco Furtner (University of Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein)
Tilman Grünbaum (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Nils Bergau (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Pierre Sachse (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Chiara Dietz (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Lucas Haraped (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Abolished associative learning in states of lust (abstract)
14:00
Michael Sprengel (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Miriam Tomat (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Mike Wendt (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Sven Knoth (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Thomas Jacobsen (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Attention or temporal learning: what explains the PCE? (abstract)
14:00
Christian Böffel (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Jochen Müsseler (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Automatic Response Activation in the Avatar Compatibility Task (abstract)
14:00
Janine Jargow (TU Dresden, Germany)
Christina Pfeuffer (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany)
Hannes Ruge (TU Dresden, Germany)
Top-down modulation of experience-based and instruction-based stimulus-category and stimulus-response associations (abstract)
14:00
Marvin Liesner (Julius Maximilians University of Würzburg, Germany)
Dissociating the role of compatibility and predictability of action-effect relations for explicit measures of the active self (abstract)
14:00
Bianca Jovanovic (University of Giessen, Germany)
Gudrun Schwarzer (University of Giessen, Germany)
Considering comfort in a social context: how children give different tools to confederates (abstract)
14:00
Lara Kirfel (University College London, UK)
David Lagnado (University College London, UK)
The impact of action frequency on causal judgements (abstract)
14:00
Katharina A. Schwarz (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Lisa Weller (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Annika L. Klaffehn (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Wilfried Kunde (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Roland Pfister (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Implicit and explicit measures capture distinct facets of human agency (abstract)
14:00
Anna Foerster (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Lisa Weller (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Pfister Roland (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Katharina Schwarz (University of Würzburg, Germany)
None of my business: Reduced agency for the consequences of lies (abstract)
14:00
Beatrix Lábadi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Orsolya Inhóf (University of Pécs, Hungary)
András Zsidó (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Darnai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Lateralisation of sense of body ownership (abstract)
14:00
Erik Lang (University of Cologne, Germany)
Angela Mariele Brands (University of Cologne, Germany)
Markus Peters (University of Cologne, Germany)
Tatyana Thye (University of Cologne, Germany)
The Role of Cognitive Flexibility in the Emergence of Explicit Knowledge in a Serial Reaction Time Task (abstract)
14:00
Denise Stephan (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Iring Koch (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Multimodal Sequence Learning (abstract)
14:00
Kyungwan Kim (Institute of Physiology and Anatomy, German Sport University Cologne, Germany)
Otmar Bock (Institute of Physiology and Anatomy, German Sport University Cologne, Germany)
Stage-wise versus parallel acquisition of landmark, route and survey knowledge in a virtual city (abstract)
14:00
Lena M. Wollschlaeger (Jacobs University Bremen, Germany)
Adele Diederich (Jacobs University Bremen, Germany)
A “psychophysical” preferential choice study of context effects with real consequences (abstract)
14:00
Mike Wendt (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Imke Gillich (Helmut Schmidt University, Germany)
Thomas Jacobsen (Helmut Schmidt University, Germany)
Cue-based preparation of non-perceptual stimulus-response translation processes: evidence from a probe task approach (abstract)
14:00
Eva Röttger (University of Cologne, Germany)
Hilde Haider (University of Cologne, Germany)
Fang Zhao (FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany)
Robert Gaschler (FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany)
Implicit sequence learning as an indicator of the adopted dual-task processing mode? (abstract)
14:00
Clarissa Lustig (University of Cologne, Germany)
Hilde Haider (University of Cologne, Germany)
Differences of experienced fluency in implicit sequence learning (abstract)
14:00
Ann-Katrin Hosch (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Janina A. Hoffmann (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Now categorize again! - Forced strategy change does not help to discover the category structure in unsupervised categorization (abstract)
14:00
Christine Blech (FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany)
Robert Gaschler (FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany)
Michael Kriechbaumer (FernUniversität in Hagen / University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany)
Felix Henninger (University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany)
Marc Jekel (University of Cologne, Germany)
Nicolas W. Schuck (Max Planck Research Group NeuroCode / Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin,, Germany)
Dorit Wenke (Private University of Applied Sciences, Göttingen / Humboldt-Universität Berlin, Germany)
Acquiring a covariation and controlling when to apply it (abstract)
14:00
Sascha Schneider (Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany)
Günter Daniel Rey (Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany)
The more options, the better we learn? The influence of choice options on learning with digital media (abstract)
14:00-16:00 Session 3C: POSTER SESSION: Attention

POSTER SESSION: Attention

Location: TMG 47
14:00
Devon Allcoat (The University of Warwick, UK)
Adrian von Muhlenen (The University of Warwick, UK)
Does the frequency of video game play affect performance in visual attention tasks? (abstract)
14:00
Sophia von Salm (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Katharina Bolzius (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Jochen Müsseler (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Seeing the World through the Eyes of an Avatar? Comparing Perspective Taking and Referential Coding. (abstract)
14:00
Martin E. Maier (Katholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Roman Liepelt (Deutsche Sporthochschule Köln, Institut für Psychologie, Germany)
Marco Steinhauser (Katholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Post-conflict and post-error adjustments in the Joint Simon task (abstract)
14:00
Annabelle Walle (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Michel D. Druey (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Ronald Hübner (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Disentangling saliency, value association and valence of a stimulus on its ability to capture attention (abstract)
14:00
András Matuz (Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Pécs, Hungary, Hungary)
Bence Schwarcz (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary, Hungary)
Kristóf János Topa (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary, Hungary)
Tárek Magyar (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary, Hungary)
Árpád Csathó (Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Pécs, Hungary, Hungary)
Perceived Duration of Cognitively Demanding Tasks: the role of Cognitive Load and Time-on-Task (abstract)
14:00
Cemre Baykan (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Adrian Von Mühlenen (The University of Warwick, UK)
Attentional biases towards threatening stimuli in social anxiety and the role of empathy (abstract)
14:00
Pamela Baess (University of Hildesheim, Germany)
Steve Janssen (Nottingham University Malaysia Campus, Malaysia)
Christina Bermeitinger (University of Hildesheim, Germany)
Cultural influences on spatial cognition: Evidence from egocentric and allocentric Simon Effects (abstract)
14:00
Sven Panis (University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Rani Moran (University College London, UK)
Maximilian Wolkersdorfer (University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Thomas Schmidt (University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Studying the dynamics of visual search behavior using RT hazard and micro-level speed-accuracy tradeoff functions: A role for recurrent object recognition and cognitive control processes (abstract)
14:00
Janina Balke (University of Tuebingen, Germany)
Verena Seibold (University of Tuebingen, Germany)
Temporal preparation facilitates bottom-up processes in spatial selection (abstract)
14:00
Nadiia Makarina (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Janina Hoffmann (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Attentional processes in multiple-cue judgments. (abstract)
14:00
Verena Seibold (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Does alertness bias attention towards salient stimuli? Evidence from stimulus-driven attentional capture (abstract)
14:00
Christina Breil (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Anne Böckler-Raettig (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
From eye to arrow: Influences of nonsocial and social cues on attention capture (abstract)
14:00
Anna Conci (FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany)
Robert Gaschler (FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany)
Merim Bilalić (Northumbria University, UK)
Attentional capacity in multimodal change (abstract)
14:00
Anja Kühnel (MSB Medical School Berlin, Germany)
Meditation and Attention (abstract)
14:00
Ulrich Pomper (University of Vienna, Faculty of Psychology, Austria)
Ulrich Ansorge (University of Vienna, Faculty of Psychology, Austria)
Impact of continuous, lateralized auditory stimulation on visual spatial attention (abstract)
14:00
Shiau-Chuen Chiou (Neurocognition and Action Group, Center of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC), Bielefeld University, Germany)
Thomas Schack (Neurocognition and Action Group, Center of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC), Bielefeld University, Germany)
Integration or separation? Effects of visual attention on temporal and spatial processing of whole-body movement sequences (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 4A: Recent Findings from Experimental Studies on the Re-occurence of Repetitive Negative Thoughts (Symposium)

Recent Findings from Experimental Studies on the Re-occurence of Repetitive Negative Thoughts (Symposium)

The experience of getting stuck in one’s own negative thoughts is extremely common and its pathological forms have been discussed as maintaining factors in several mental disorders. In this symposium, repetitive negative thoughts (RNT) is an umbrella term for negative, repetitive, and uncontrollable thoughts, images or memories that are intrusive and difficult to disengage from. Five presentations address either factors that influence RNT, such as negative appraisals, or factors that are influenced by RNT, such as positive affect. The first study investigates whether rumination – in comparison to distraction - has an imminent effect on unwanted intrusive thoughts about a car accident of a beloved person in undergraduate students. The second presentation addresses the question whether in high worriers, a positive interpretation training reduces levels of worry, compared to an active control group. The third study predicts that mode of rumination (abstract vs. concrete) and type of emotion (sadness vs. anger) have an interactive effect on affect. The fourth presentation shows that positive reappraisal training results in lower intrusion distress from negative autobiographical events than negative reappraisal training. Finally, the last presentation addresses the influence of positive memory elaboration training compared to control training on repetitive negative thoughts in daily life and concludes that positive memory elaborations are helpful in reducing RNT.

Chairs:
Michelle Moulds (The University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney), UK)
Karina Wahl (University of Basel, Switzerland)
16:30
Martin Mazanec (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Carlotta V. Heinzel (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Patrizia D. Hofer (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Roselind Lieb (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Karina Wahl (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Recent findings from experimental studies on the re-occurence of repetitive negative thoughts (Submission: 110, talk number 1) (abstract)
16:50
Ya-Chun Feng (Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK)
Charlotte Krahé (School of Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, University of Liverpool, UK)
Frances Meeten (School of Psychology, University of Sussex, UK)
Alexander Sumich (Division of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, UK)
Colette Hirsch (Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK)
Recent findings from experimental studies on the re-occurence of repetitive negative thought (110-2) — Understanding the interpretation bias in worry and the effect of cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I) on reducing worry. (abstract)
17:10
Carlotta V. Heinzel (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Martin Mazanec (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Roselind Lieb (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Karina Wahl (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Recent findings from experimental studies on the re-occurence of repetitive negative thoughts (Submission 110, talk number 3) (abstract)
17:30
Marcella Woud (Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany)
Felix Würtz (Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany)
Recent findings from experimental studies on the re-occurence of repetitive negative thoughts (Symposium 110), 4 (abstract)
17:50
Michelle Moulds (The University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney), Australia)
Recent findings from experimental studies on the re-occurence of repetitive negative thoughts (symposium 110) (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 4B: Neuro-cognitive Control Mechanisms in Human Multi-tasking (Symposium)

Neuro-cognitive Control Mechanisms in Human Multi-tasking (Symposium)

Multitasking, i.e. performing more than one task concurrently, has become an ubiquitous and inevitable aspect of our modern life. Although it might seem that we do not have any difficulties with performing temporally overlapping tasks, usually severe performance decrements emerge in these multitasking situations. In the last decades, a vast body of theories from behavioral research has explained the persistent occurrence of performance decrements in multitasking and the role of cognitive control mechanisms in dealing with these. Based on these profound conceptions, in this symposium we aim to further advance the understanding of the neural mechanisms involved in specific aspects of human multitasking, focusing on neuro-cognitive control mechanisms involved in concurrent task processing. For this purpose, a series of empirical studies employing various neuroscientific research methods will be presented. These studies cover the role of different brain regions such as the basal ganglia or the lateral prefrontal cortex for enabling multitasking performance. Furthermore, the studies address how structural as well as functional brain differences can account for individual differences in cognitive as well as cognitive-motor multitasking performance. Also, they will shed light on neuro-cognitive subprocesses that are required for multitasking, such as executive control or error-monitoring. In addition to these studies, in a concluding discussion we will integrate the findings and provide perspectives for future research.

Chairs:
Sebastian Kübler (Humboldt-Universität zu berlin, Germany)
Christine Stelzel (International Psychoanalytic University Berlin, Germany)
Location: GC1-08
16:30
Christian Beste (TU Dresden, Germany)
Neuro-cognitive control mechanisms in human multitasking 1 (abstract)
16:50
Hannah Bohle (International Psychoanalytic University, Germany)
Gesche Schauenburg (Universität Potsdam, Germany)
Henrik Walter (Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany)
Urs Granacher (Universität Potsdam, Germany)
Stephan Heinzel (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany)
Michael Rapp (Universität Potsdam, Germany)
Christine Stelzel (International Psychoanalytic University, Germany)
Neuro-cognitive control mechanisms in human multitasking 2 (abstract)
17:10
Sebastian Kübler (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Alexander Soutschek (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Tilo Strobach (MSH Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Torsten Schubert (Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Germany)
Neuro-cognitive control mechanisms in human multitasking 3 (abstract)
17:30
Robert Steinhauser (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Marco Steinhauser (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Neuro-cognitive control mechanisms in human multitasking 4 (abstract)
17:50
Andre Szameitat (Brunel University, UK)
Pauldy Otermans (Brunel University, UK)
Neuro-cognitive control mechanisms in human multitasking 5 (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 4C: Advances in Auditory Distraction Research (Symposium)

Advances in Auditory Distraction Research (Symposium)

It is a well-established finding that working memory processes are disrupted by distractor speech. Different theories have been proposed about the mechanisms that are responsible for the disruptive effect. The symposium will bring together researchers with divergent theoretical positions who will present novel findings about the acoustic and semantic properties that cause auditory distraction and the types of processes that are susceptible to it. The talks will broaden our knowledge about why it is so difficult to ignore irrelevant speech and provide new insights on how cognitive processing can be shielded from its detrimental effects. These advances in auditory distraction research are not least driven by methodological improvements such as rigorous power analyses, preregistered replications, Bayesian meta-analyses and precise (mathematical) formulations of hypotheses.

Chairs:
Raoul Bell (Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Jan Philipp Röer (Universität Witten/Herdecke, Germany)
Location: TMG-58
16:30
Jan Philipp Röer (Witten/Herdecke University, Germany)
Raoul Bell (Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Axel Buchner (Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Symposium: Advances in auditory distraction research (Talk 1) (abstract)
16:50
Raoul Bell (Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Jan Philipp Röer (Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Albert-Georg Lang (Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Axel Buchner (Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Symposium: Advances in auditory distraction research (Talk 2) (abstract)
17:10
Philip Beaman (University of Reading, UK)
Symposium: Advances in auditory distraction research (Talk 3) (abstract)
17:30
Tatiana Kvetnaya (Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany)
Kristina Schopf (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Florian Wickelmaier (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Symposium: Advances in auditory distraction research (Talk 4) (abstract)
17:50
Florian Kattner (Technische Universität Darmstadt, University of Hamburg, Germany)
Wolfgang Ellermeier (TU Darmstadt, Germany)
Symposium: Advances in auditory distraction research (Talk 5) (abstract)
18:10
John E. Marsh (University of Central Lancashire, UK)
Jan Philipp Röer (Witten/Herdecke University, Germany)
Emma Threadgold (University of Central Lancashire, UK)
Linden J. Ball (University of Central Lancashire, UK)
Symposium: Advances in auditory distraction research (Talk 6) (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 4D: Motivation and Interest (Individual Talks)

Motivation and Interest (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Andreas Eder (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Location: TM1-06
16:30
Annika Boldt (University College London, UK)
Sam Gilbert (University College London, UK)
Confidence Guides Spontaneous Cognitive Offloading (abstract)
16:50
Anand Krishna (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Andreas B. Eder (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
From pre-training evaluations to motivational states - determinants of the effectiveness of approach-avoidance training (abstract)
17:10
Demian Scherer (University of Münster, Germany)
Annika Verkühlen (University of Münster, Germany)
Stephan Dutke (University of Münster, Germany)
The influence of decorative pictures on learning, interest, and metacognition (abstract)
17:30
Valerie A. Erkens (Justus-Liebig Universität Gießen, Germany)
Urs M. Nater (Universität Wien, Austria)
Jan A. Häusser (Justus-Liebig Universität Gießen, Germany)
Contagious Stress: Effects of Social Identification (abstract)
17:50
Roland Pfister (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Wilfried Kunde (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Katharina Schwarz (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Lisa Weller (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Something from nothing: Agency for deliberate non-actions (abstract)
18:10
Anja Berger (University of Regensburg, Germany)
Rico Fischer (University of Greifswald, Germany)
Gesine Dreisbach (University of Regensburg, Germany)
Both shielding and relaxation contribute to conflict adaptation (abstract)
18:30
Robert Schorn (UMIT - Private University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Dagmar Abfalter (mdw - University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Austria)
It’s all in the smile – the effect of reduced anthropomorphized product presentation (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 4E: Conditioning (Individual Talks)

Conditioning (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Anne Gast (University of Cologne, Germany)
Location: TM2-02
16:30
Anne Gast (Universität Köln, Germany)
Jasmin Richter (Universität Köln, Germany)
Borys Ruszpel (Universität Köln, Germany)
Is There Evidence for Unaware Evaluative Conditioning in a Valence Contingency Learning Task? (abstract)
16:50
Jasmin Richter (University of Cologne, Germany)
Anne Gast (University of Cologne, Germany)
Does implicit misattribution occur during evaluative conditioning? (abstract)
17:10
Lea Sperlich (University of Cologne, Germany)
Christian Unkelbach (University of Cologne, Germany)
What is a pairing in Evaluative Conditioning? (abstract)
17:30
Fabia Högden (University of Cologne, Germany)
Christian Unkelbach (University of Cologne, Germany)
Relational information affects Attribute Conditioning (abstract)
17:50
Taylor Benedict (University of Cologne, Germany)
Anne Gast (University of Cologne, Germany)
The Influence of Aversive Unconditioned Stimuli in Evaluative Conditioning (abstract)
18:10
Anja Leue (University of Kiel, Germany)
Katharina Nieden (University of Kiel, Germany)
Vera Scheuble (University of Bonn, Germany)
André Beauducel (University of Bonn, Germany)
Conflict monitoring during reinforcement learning: Individual differences of mock suspect and non-suspect differentiation (abstract)
18:30
Maria Pankrath (Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Science, Germany)
Cristina Massen (Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Science, Germany)
Effects of goal-framing and additional information on perceived information quality, usefulness and behavioural intention in the context of energy saving tips (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 4F: Virtual Reality, Simulations and Games (Individual Talks)

Virtual Reality, Simulations and Games (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Roberta Sellaro (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Location: BPLG-02
16:30
Roberta Sellaro (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Bernhard Hommel (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Virtual reality: a paradigm shift to assess cognitive and social functioning (abstract)
16:50
Angelika C. Kern (TU Darmstadt, Germany)
Wolfgang Ellermeier (TU Darmstadt, Germany)
Sandra Baum (TU Darmstadt, Germany)
Aziza Khodjaeva (TU Darmstadt, Germany)
Hatice Kübra Özcan (TU Darmstadt, Germany)
Are you really up there? The influence of ambient sound and simulated height on experienced ‘presence’ in VR exposure to high altitude (abstract)
17:10
Sarah-Maria Goerlitz (Hochschule Fresenius, University of Applied Sciences, Germany)
Patric Schubert (Hochschule Fresenius, University of Applied Sciences, Germany)
Christoph Dietz (Hochschule Fresenius, University of Applied Sciences, Germany)
Johanna Möller (Hochschule Fresenius, University of Applied Sciences, Germany)
Simone Siedler (Hochschule Fresenius, University of Applied Sciences, Germany)
Sabine Hammer (Hochschule Fresenius, University of Applied Sciences, Germany)
Christian T. Haas (Hochschule Fresenius, University of Applied Sciences, Germany)
Keep your distance! Distance behavior after semi-automated truck platoon driving under real traffic conditions (abstract)
17:30
Marian Sauter (Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany)
Maximilian Stefani (Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany)
Wolfgang Mack (Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany)
Playing for Science! Real-time Strategy Games as a Tool to Research Human Multitasking (abstract)
17:50
Alexandra Hoffmann (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Corinna A. Faust-Christmann (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Gregor Zolynski (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Gabriele Bleser (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
An experimental approach for the agile development of a gamified stress management app (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 4G: Motor Control (Individual Talks)

Motor Control (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Wilfried Kunde (Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg, Germany)
Location: GCG-08
16:30
Christina Stuhr (University of Rostock, Germany)
Tino Stöckel (University of Rostock, Germany)
Cognitive and motor function development in early childhood (abstract)
16:50
Wilfried Kunde (Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg, Germany)
Lisa Weller (Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg, Germany)
Binding Effects in Action Plans (abstract)
17:10
Nina M. Hanning (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Heiner Deubel (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
The actions take it all, voluntary attention standing small: Motor preparation overrides endogenous attention (abstract)
17:30
William Chapman (School of Psychological Science, University of Bristol, UK)
Casimir Ludwig (School of Psychological Science, University of Bristol, UK)
The effects of perceptual uncertainty in reach and grasp movements. (abstract)
17:50
Oliver Herbort (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Wladimir Kirsch (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Wilfried Kunde (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Grasp Planning for Object Manipulation without Simulation of the Object Manipulation Action (abstract)
18:10
Aaron C. Zoeller (Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Germany)
Knut Drewing (Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Germany)
Explicit Prior Information Interferes with Implicit Tuning of Haptic Softness Exploration (abstract)
18:30
Thomas Camus (Department of Psychology, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany, Germany)
Lionel Brunel (Epsylon Laboratory, Paul Valéry University-Montpellier 3, Montpellier, France, France)
Assessing the integration of motor related components in Stimulus-Response Compatibility effects (abstract)
19:15-21:00 Session 5: DGPS Open and Public Meeting of the Cognitive Section

DGPS Open and Public Meeting of the Cognitive Section

Chair:
Dirk Wentura (Saarland University, Germany)
Tuesday, April 16th

View this program: with abstractssession overviewtalk overview

09:00-11:00 Session 6A: Cognitive Processes in Categorization Decisions (Symposium)

Cognitive Processes in Categorization Decisions (Symposium)

A growing theoretical diversity makes it increasingly difficult to meet the demands upon testing and interpreting theoretical assumptions on how people acquire knowledge about categories that form the basis for making decisions. To clarify the assumed processes requires testing the behavioural predictions of category learning models. At the same time, it is crucial to test basic assumptions on the underlying cognitive processes, for instance, on the role of similarity based generalization in category representations, or the distribution of attention during recall of category instances. The symposium congregates researchers presenting their recent advances in modelling and measuring the cognitive processes underlying category learning and decision making. A collection of six talks will provide insights and possible solutions through rigorous experimental designs, cognitive computational modelling and process tracing (eye-tracking). 1) Maarten Speekenbrink shows how outcome uncertainty in experience-based decisions guides the generalization and transfer of prior beliefs in exploration tasks. 2) Janina Hoffman presents a learning model that integrates knowledge abstraction with retrieval from memory to predict judgment accuracy and familiarity-based choices. 3) René Schlegelmilch will introduce a novel category learning model, which provides a powerful alternative to classical (problem-specific) approaches. 4) Andy Wills presents an open collaboration project making statistical tools accessible for concurrent model analyses, simulations, and hypotheses testing. 5) Agnes Rosner will show how eye-tracking methods can be used to test cognitive processes underlying memory-based categorization decisions. 6) The last talk by Emmanuel Pothos brings together both eye-tracking and cognitive modelling to describe information search during categorisation decision making.

Chairs:
Agnes Rosner (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
René Schlegelmilch (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
09:00
Maarten Speekenbrink (University College London, UK)
Cognitive Processes in Categorization Decisions 1 (abstract)
09:20
Janina Hoffmann (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Rebecca Albrecht (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Bettina von Helversen (UNiversity of Switzerland, Switzerland)
Cognitive Processes in Categorization Decisions 2 (abstract)
09:40
René Schlegelmilch (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Andy J. Wills (Plymouth University, UK)
Bettina von Helversen (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Cognitive Processes in Categorization Decisions 3 (abstract)
10:00
Andy Wills (Plymouth University, UK)
Cognitive Processes in Categorization Decisions 4 (abstract)
10:20
Agnes Rosner (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Bettina von Helversen (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Cognitive Processes in Categorization Decisions 5 (abstract)
10:40
Emmanuel Pothos (City, University of London, UK)
Agnes Rosner (University of Zurich, Germany)
Irina Basieva (City, University of London, UK)
Barque-Duran (City, University of London, UK)
Gloeckner (Max Planck Institute for Collective Goods, UK)
von Helversen (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Khrennikov (University of Linnaeus, Sweden)
Cognitive Processes in Categorization Decisions 6 (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 6B: Experimental Aesthetics 1 (Symposium)

Experimental Aesthetics 1 (Symposium)

Experimental Aesthetics is the second-oldest branch of Experimental Psychology. Subsequent to his Psychophysics, Gustav Theodor Fechner established the empirical, experimental study of aesthetics "from below", using empirical building blocks. Firmly grounded in the psychophysical and cognitive paradigms, the field continues to thrive. Our symposium convenes contributions investigating aesthetic domains ranging from dance, literature, music, visual arts, and more. Researchers engage in the quest for elucidating domain-general as well as highly domain-specific mental processing architecture.

Chair:
Thomas Jacobsen (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Location: GC1-08
09:00
Marcos Nadal (University of the Balearic Islands, Spain)
Sun Xiaolei (University of the Balearic Islands, Spain)
Jiajia Xe (University of the Balearic Islands, Spain)
Erick G Chuquichambi (University of the Balearic Islands, Spain)
Executive processes in the aesthetic appreciation of paintings (abstract)
09:20
Chris McManus (University College London, UK)
Cross-cultural effects in aesthetics? (abstract)
09:40
Letizia Palumbo (Liverpool Hope University, UK)
Marco Bertamini (University of Liverpool, UK)
The multidimensional nature of the preference for smooth curvature (abstract)
10:00
Winfried Menninghaus (Max Planck Institute of Empirical Aesthetics, Germany)
Poetic speech melody (abstract)
10:20
Beatriz Calvo-Merino (City University, UK)
The Aesthetic Homunculus: embodiment and expertise effects in aesthetics judgements (abstract)
10:40
Marco Bertamini (University of Liverpool, UK)
Giulia Rampone (University of Liverpool, UK)
Alexis D.J. Makin (University of Liverpool, UK)
Do people like what the brain likes? (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 6C: Cognitive Modeling in Experimental Psychology (Symposium)

Cognitive Modeling in Experimental Psychology (Symposium)

Cognitive modeling provides a powerful methodological tool in various domains of experimental psychology (e.g., memory, categorization, judgment and decision making). Despite its long tradition in psychology (e.g., Estes, 1950), it has become a more widespread approach only recently (e.g., Farrell & Lewandowsky, 2018; Busemeyer & Diederich, 2009; Lee & Wagenmakers, 2013). Recent technical advances (e.g., Bayesian estimation approaches, hierarchical modeling) and novel software tools have facilitated the application of cognitive modeling and enable an increasingly large number of researcher to incorporate cognitive modeling into their methodological arsenal. This symposium features recent applications of cognitive modeling in experimental psychology and has three goals. First, it will be shown how cognitive modeling can help disentangle and measure latent psychological processes that are not readily visible in observed data (e.g., learning processes, evaluation, memory and response processes). Second, the symposium demonstrates how formal models enable one to derive precise quantitative predictions of extant theoretical ideas that can then be compared to each other based on empirical data (e.g., heuristics vs. optimal models), and how the theoretical constructs of different models can be related to each other. The third goal of the symposium is to present and discuss novel methodological developments of cognitive modeling (implementation in meta-analysis, testing the robustness across estimation methods). The symposium will bring together researchers from various research groups in Europe, reflecting the increasing popularity and usefulness of cognitive modeling in experimental psychology.

Chairs:
Thorsten Pachur (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Henrik Singmann (The University of Warwick, UK)
Location: TMG-58
09:00
Jana Jarecki (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Jörg Rieskamp (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Cognitive Modeling in Experimental Psychology 1 (abstract)
09:20
Thorsten Pachur (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Veronika Zilker (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Cognitive modeling in experimental psychology 2 (abstract)
09:40
Hrvoje Stojic (University College London, UK)
Eric Schulz (Harvard University, United States)
Pantelis P. Analytis (University of Southern Denmark, Denmark)
Maarten Speekenbrink (University College London, UK)
Cognitive Modeling in Experimental Psychology 3 (abstract)
10:00
Peter Shepherdson (University of Akureyri, Iceland)
Cognitive Modeling in Experimental Psychology 4 (abstract)
10:20
Julia Groß (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Thorsten Pachur (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany)
Cognitive Modeling in Experimental Psychology 5 (abstract)
10:40
Henrik Singmann (The University of Warwick, UK)
Daniel W. Heck (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Marius Barth (Universität zu Köln, Germany)
Julia Groß (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Beatrice G. Kuhlmann (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Cognitive Modeling in Experimental Psychology 6 (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 6D: Learning (Individual Talks)

Learning (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Dejan Draschkow (University of Oxford, UK)
Location: TM2-02
09:00
Dejan Draschkow (Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, UK)
Melissa Vo (Department of Psychology, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany)
Incidental learning during natural tasks creates reliable long-term memory representations which proactively guide behavior (abstract)
09:20
Joshua Lorenzen (Kiel University, Germany)
Christian Kaernbach (Kiel University, Germany)
Implicit Learning of an Artificial Musical Structure on Stable vs Unstable Pitch Scales (abstract)
09:40
Svenja Heitmann (Ruhr-Universität, Germany)
Axel Grund (Bielefeld, Germany)
Kirsten Berthold (University of Bielefeld, Germany)
Stefan Fries (Bielefeld, Germany)
Julian Roelle (Ruhr-Universität, Germany)
Adaptive Quizzing Further Increases Learning Outcomes (abstract)
10:00
Harald Ewolds (University of Augsburg, Germany)
Laura Broeker (German Sport University Cologne, Germany)
Markus Raab (German Sport University Cologne, London South Bank University, Germany)
Rita de Oliveira (London South Bank University, UK)
Stefan Künzell (University of Augsburg, Germany)
Dual-task performance and motor learning with predictable tasks (abstract)
10:20
Diana Vogel (TU Dresden, Germany)
Markus Janczyk (Universität Tübingen, Germany)
Stefan Scherbaum (TU Dresden, Germany)
The Impact of Verbal Instruction and Task Features on the Expression of Ideomotor Effect Anticipations (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 6E: Social Psychology (Individual Talks)

Social Psychology (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Miriam Gade (Medical School Berlin, Germany)
Location: TM1-06
09:00
Momme von Sydow (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Muenchen, MCMP, Germany)
Niels Braus (Uni Heidelberg, Germany)
Ulrike Hahn (Birkbeck College, University of London, Department of Psychological Science, UK)
Thinking Locally or Globally? – Trying to Overcome the Tragedy of Personnel Evaluation (abstract)
09:20
Klaus Harnack (WOP - Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany)
Julian Voigt (WOP - Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany)
Alba Moya-Garófano (University of Granada, Spain)
Miguel Moya (University of Granada, Spain)
Influence of the comparative context on meta-stereotyping (abstract)
09:40
Lars König (University of Münster, Germany)
Regina Jucks (University of Münster, Germany)
Developing Trust in Virtual Learning Environments: It’s a Matter of Language Style (abstract)
10:00
Eva Riechelmann (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Lisa Weller (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Lynn Huestegge (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Anne Böckler (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Roland Pfister (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Revisiting intersubjective action-effect binding: No evidence for social moderators (abstract)
10:20
Karolin Salmen (Heidelberg University, Germany)
Maarten Speekenbrink (University College London, UK)
Ulrike Hahn (Birkbeck, University of London, UK)
Individual Belief Updating Depends on the Distance to Other Estimates and Being an Outlier to Different Social Groups (abstract)
10:40
Isabelle Freiling (University of Münster, Germany)
Lars König (University of Münster, Germany)
Could You Repeat That? Replicating the “Good Sound Good Research” Effect (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 6F: Decision-Making 2 (Individual Talks)

Decision-Making 2 (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Rita Silva (University of Cologne, Germany)
Location: GCG-08
09:00
Rita Silva (University of Cologne, Germany)
Fluency Specificity: Fluency effects are subject to a match between the source of fluency and the judgment dimension (abstract)
09:20
Victoria Striewe (University of Cologne, Germany)
Sascha Topolinski (University of Cologne, Germany)
The Sequence of Standard and Target in Social and Economic Comparisons (abstract)
09:40
Matthew Stephensen (UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Norway)
Torsten Martiny-Huenger (UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Norway)
How the Attractiveness of a Stimulus Influences Risk Judgements (abstract)
10:00
Christin Schulze (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Wolfgang Gaissmaier (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Ben R. Newell (The University of New South Wales, Australia)
Maximizing as satisficing: On pattern matching and probability maximizing in groups and individuals (abstract)
10:20
Anna Thoma (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Christin Schulze (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Dries Trippas (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Ralf Kurvers (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Thorsten Pachur (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
When Actions Do Not Speak Louder Than Words: A Multi-Method Approach to Dyadic Multiple-Cue Inference (abstract)
10:40
Sebastian Olschewski (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Jörg Rieskamp (University of Basel, Switzerland)
The effect of time pressure and gamble complexity on risky choice (abstract)
13:00-14:00 Free Berisoft Bring-Your-Lunch Workshop: Designing an Experiment in Cognition Lab (30 places, please register with joerg.beringer@berisoft.com)

Free Berisoft Lunch Workshop: Designing an Experiment in Cognition Lab (30 places, please register with joerg.beringer@berisoft.com)

Location: TM3-02
13:00-14:00 Free EYELINK Bring-Your-Lunch Workshop (36 places, please register with kurt@sr-research.com)

Free EYELINK Lunch Workshop (36 places, please register with kurt@sr-research.com)

Location: TM3-01
14:00-16:00 Session 8A: POSTER SESSION: Decisions and Cognitive Control

POSTER SESSION: Decisions and Cognitive Control

Location: BPLG-01
14:00
Nina Brück (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Germany)
Morality within children's sibling relationships and friendships (abstract)
14:00
Ronja M. J. Boege (Bielefeld, Germany)
Ilka Krogmeier (Bielefeld, Germany)
Roman Linne (Bielefeld, Germany)
Tina Glaser (Pädagogische Hochschule Karlsruhe, Germany)
Gerd Bohner (Bielefeld, Germany)
Immediate displacement, delayed generalization: Testing the lateral attitude change model (abstract)
14:00
Linda McCaughey (Heidelberg University, Germany)
Johannes Prager (Heidelberg University, Germany)
Klaus Fiedler (Heidelberg University, Germany)
Rivals rebooted - what we learn from others in speed-accuracy trade-offs (abstract)
14:00
Tjasa Omerzu (University of Konstanz, Germany)
Janina Hoffmann (University of Konstanz, Germany)
How does learning new information affect judgment policies? (abstract)
14:00
Scarlett Kobs (University of Potsdam, Germany)
Michel Knigge (University of Potsdam, Germany)
Reinhold Kliegl (University of Potsdam, Germany)
The influence of situational factors on the perceived fairness of school interactions (abstract)
14:00
Linda Onnasch (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Seulji Chung (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Anthropomorphizing Robots: The Effect of Framing in Human-Robot Cooperation (abstract)
14:00
Corinna Lorenz (Saarland University, Germany)
Jutta Kray (Saarland University, Germany)
The role of individual differences in risk-taking across adolescence: How impulsivity and empathy could tell us more than age (abstract)
14:00
Zahra Khosrowtaj (University of Marburg, Germany)
Philipp Süssenbach (Fachhochschule des Mittelstands, Germany)
Sarah Teige-Mocigemba (University of Marburg, Germany)
Does your name reveal your blame? On the effect of the perpetrator’s ethnicity, negative attitudes against Muslims, and rape myth acceptance on judgments of a rape case (abstract)
14:00
Barbara Kreis (Saarland University, Department of Psychology, Germany)
Corinna Lorenz (Saarland University, Department of Psychology, Germany)
Jutta Kray (Saarland University, Department of Psychology, Germany)
Dismantling decision-making under known risk in adolescence – On the influence of incentive valence, expected value and cognitive abilities (abstract)
14:00
Ramona Allstadt Torras (University of Hagen, Germany)
Angela Dorrough (University of Cologne, Germany)
Andreas Glöckner (University of Cologne, Germany)
Stereotype-based employment discrimination of people with mental vs. physical disorders (abstract)
14:00
Madita Frickhoeffer (University of Duesseldorf, Germany)
Jochen Musch (University of Duesseldorf, Germany)
Honesty contracts: A simple method to elicit truthful answers to embarrassing questions (abstract)
14:00
Silke M. Mueller (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
Heike Averbeck (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
Elisa Wegmann (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
Matthias Brand (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
Dual-tasking in risky decision making: Do parallel auditory working memory demands affect choice performance in complex situations? (abstract)
14:00
Martha Michalkiewicz (Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Germany)
Olga Rashidi (Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Germany)
In search of homo heuristicus: Do users of the recognition heuristic also employ the fluency heuristic? (abstract)
14:00
Saskia Heijnen (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Roberta Sellaro (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Bernhard Hommel (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Cross-cultural differences in metacontrol policies: Evidence from task-switching (abstract)
14:00
Elisa Straub (Institute for Psychology, Germany)
Andrea Kiesel (Institute for Psychology, Germany)
David Dignath (Institute for Psychology, Germany)
Cognitive Control of Emotional Distraction – valence-specific or general? (abstract)
14:00
Birte Moeller (University of Trier, Germany)
Christian Frings (University of Trier, Germany)
Hierarchical bindings in action control (abstract)
14:00
Julia Kozlik (University of Greifswald, Germany)
Rico Fischer (University of Greifswald, Germany)
A smile as a conflict: Affective mismatch between emotional expressions and group membership induces conflict and triggers cognitive control (abstract)
14:00
Devu Mahesan (University of Greifswald, Germany)
Markus Janczyk (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Rico Fischer (University of Greifswald, Germany)
Contextual modulation of motor-based between-task interference in dual tasking (abstract)
14:00
Victoria K. E. Bart (UMIT, Austria)
Erdenechimeg Sharavdorj (National University of Mongolia, Mongolia)
Khishignyam Bazarvaani (National University of Mongolia, Mongolia)
Tegshbuyan Munkhbat (School of Economics and Statistics, Guangzhou University, China)
Dorit Wenke (PFH – Private University for Applied Science, Germany)
Martina Rieger (UMIT, Austria)
Cultures differ in their use of sense of agency cues (abstract)
14:00
Angela Bair (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Alexandra Hoffmann (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Casandra I. Montoro (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Stefan Duschek (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Cerebral Blood Flow Modulations During Proactive Control in Chronical Low Blood Pressure (abstract)
14:00
Tilo Strobach (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Sebastian Kübler (Humboldt-Universität zu berlin, Germany)
Mike Wendt (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Torsten Schubert (Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Germany)
A Gratton-like effect concerning task order in dual-task situations (abstract)
14:00
Irina Monno (Albert-Ludwigs-University, Freiburg, Germany)
Victor Mittelstädt (Albert-Ludwigs-University, Freiburg, Germany)
Andrea Kiesel (Albert-Ludwigs-University, Freiburg, Germany)
Optimization criteria of self-organized task switching: tradeoff between waiting costs and switch costs in multitasking (abstract)
14:00
Magnus Liebherr (University Duisburg-Essen, General Psychology: Cognition, Germany)
Stephanie Antons (University Duisburg-Essen, General Psychology: Cognition, Germany)
Lena Kölmel (University Duisburg-Essen, General Psychology: Cognition, Germany)
Matthias Brand (University Duisburg-Essen, General Psychology: Cognition, Germany)
Switching Attentional Demands - On the relevance of impulsivity, working memory, and basic attentional functions (abstract)
14:00
Marton Kovacs (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary)
Attila Szuts (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary)
Tom Hardwicke (Stanford University, United States)
Rink Hoekstra (University of Groningen, Netherlands)
Balazs Aczel (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary)
Exploring Psychological Researchers’ Data Management Mistakes (abstract)
14:00
Felicitas V. Muth (Julius-Maximilians University Würzburg, Germany)
Lisa Weller (Julius-Maximilians University Würzburg, Germany)
Wilfried Kunde (Julius-Maximilians University Würzburg, Germany)
Temporal Binding in Multistep Action-Event Sequences (abstract)
14:00
Elisa Wegmann (General Psychology: Cognition and Center for Behavioral Addiction Research (CeBAR), University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
Sina Ostendorf (General Psychology: Cognition and Center for Behavioral Addiction Research (CeBAR), University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
Matthias Brand (General Psychology: Cognition and Center for Behavioral Addiction Research (CeBAR), University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
Performing a secondary executive task with addiction-related stimuli is associated with an addictive use of social media applications (abstract)
14:00
Vanessa Jurczyk (University of Regensburg, Germany)
Kerstin Fröber (University of Regensburg, Germany)
Gesine Dreisbach (University of Regensburg, Germany)
Does the subjective cost of effort determine the choice between tasks of unequal difficulty? (abstract)
14:00
Katrina Sabah (Regensburg University, Germany)
Thomas Dolk (Regensburg University, Germany)
Nachshon Meiran (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel)
Gesine Dreisbach (Regensburg University, Germany)
Power to the Learner? Examining Learners’ Control in Short Term Task Switching Training (abstract)
14:00-16:00 Session 8B: POSTER SESSION: Eyetracking and Neuroscience

POSTER SESSION: Eyetracking and Neuroscience

Location: TMG 45
14:00
Lars-Michael Schöpper (University of Trier, Germany)
Markus Lappe (University of Münster, Germany)
Christian Frings (University of Trier, Germany)
No distractor-response binding in a saccadic discrimination task (abstract)
14:00
Benjamin Ernst (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Marco Steinhauser (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Time dilation during the preparation of difficult tasks is caused by the increased release of norepinephrine as indicated by pupil dilation and P3b amplitude (abstract)
14:00
Christian Büsel (University of Vienna, Austria)
Thomas Ditye (University of Vienna, Austria)
Lukas Muttenthaler (University of Vienna, Austria)
Ulrich Ansorge (University of Vienna, Austria)
A Novel Test of Irrelevance Induced Blindness (abstract)
14:00
Fabian Ries (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Human and Industrial Engineering (ifab), Germany)
Sibylle de Vandière (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Human and Industrial Engineering (ifab), Germany)
Jascha Löbel (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Human and Industrial Engineering (ifab), Germany)
Dániel Kiss-Illés (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Human and Industrial Engineering (ifab), Germany)
Barbara Deml (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Human and Industrial Engineering (ifab), Germany)
An experimental approach to investigating visual complexity using eye tracking (abstract)
14:00
Hannes Münchow (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Tobias Richter (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Sebastian Schmid (University of Regensburg, Germany)
Judging the plausibility of informal arguments: An eye-tracking approach to identify different processing strategies during reading (abstract)
14:00
Lucas Lörch (University of Mannheim, Germany)
A new view on complex span tasks. Using eye tracking to reveal the influence of memory load on eye movements. (abstract)
14:00
Benedict Fehringer (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Stefan Münzer (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Describing cognitive processes by Hidden Markov Models of Eye Tracking Data to indicate test performance (abstract)
14:00
Mareike Brych (University of Wuerzburg, Germany)
Supriya Murali (University of Wuerzburg, Germany)
Barbara Händel (University of Wuerzburg, Germany)
Blinking is linked to motor but not to cognitive aspects of a conversation (abstract)
14:00
Jan Grenzebach (Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Cognitive Systems Lab, Germany)
Thomas G.G. Wegner (Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Physics of Cognition Group, Germany)
Wolfgang Einhäuser (Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Physics of Cognition Group, Germany)
Alexandra Bendixen (Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Cognitive Systems Lab, Germany)
Pupil dilation signals perceptual switches in auditory multistability (abstract)
14:00
Sylvia Peißl (University of Innsbruck and AUVA, Austria)
Anita Bregenzer (University of Graz, Austria)
Rithi Baruah (Christ University Bangalore, India)
Lisa Hopfgartner (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Evaluation of assessment strategies for pilots with particular focus on incorporating non-cognitive aptitudes (abstract)
14:00
Katrin Linstedt (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Human and Industrial Engineering, Germany)
Tim Buchholz (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Human and Industrial Engineering, Germany)
Barbara Deml (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Human and Industrial Engineering, Germany)
Gaze Transfer: Examining Characteristics of Gaze Visualisation Methods (abstract)
14:00
Ana-Maria Rosca (University of Freiburg, Germany)
Christina Pfeuffer (University of Freiburg, Germany)
What time´s the future?: Temporal expectancy violations affect anticipatory saccades towards future action consequences (abstract)
14:00
Stefan Duschek (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Angela Bair (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Alexandra Hoffmann (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Casandra I. Montoro (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Austria)
Ulrich Ettinger (University of Bonn, Germany)
Cerebral Blood Flow Modulations during Precued Antisaccades in Chronic low Blood Pressure (abstract)
14:00
Jérôme Rimpel (University of Potsdam, Research Focus Cognitive Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Science, Germany)
Hannah Bohle (International Psychoanalytic University, Germany)
Gesche Schauenburg (University of Potsdam, Research Focus Cognitive Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Science, Germany)
Christine Stelzel (International Psychoanalytic University, Germany)
Stephan Heinzel (Freie Universität Berlin, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Germany)
Michael Rapp (University of Potsdam, Research Focus Cognitive Sciences, Division of Social and Preventive Medicine, Germany)
Markus Brahms (University of Potsdam, Research Focus Cognitive Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Science, Germany)
Urs Granacher (University of Potsdam, Research Focus Cognitive Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Science, Germany)
Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Cognitive-Motor Interference during Multitasking in Young and Old Adults (abstract)
14:00
Klara Steinhauser (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Robert Steinhauser (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Marco Steinhauser (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
NEURAL ERROR PROCESSING IN A MULTIFRAME VISUAL SEARCH PARADIGM WITH COVERT NON-MOTOR RESPONSES (abstract)
14:00
Timea Budai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Nikolett Arató (Department of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Orsolya Inhóf (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Darnai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Andras Zsido (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Szabolcs Bandi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Beatrix Lábadi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Kata Lénárd (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gábor Perlaki (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Orsi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
József Janszky (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Impulsivity and language network: an independent component analysis (abstract)
14:00
Erika Künstler (Jena University Hospital, Germany)
Kathrin Finke (Jena University Hospital, Germany)
Peter Bublak (Jena University Hospital, Germany)
The cerebellum in motor-cognitive dual-tasks: Evidence from a patient cohort (abstract)
14:00
Marie-Luise Roth-Paysen (Institute of Medical Psychology and Systems Neuroscience, University of Muenster, Germany)
Annika Theresa Hense (Institute of Medical Psychology and Systems Neuroscience, University of Muenster, Germany)
Maximilian Bruchmann (Institute of Medical Psychology and Systems Neuroscience, University of Muenster, Germany)
Thomas Straube (Institute of Medical Psychology and Systems Neuroscience, University of Muenster, Germany)
The neural fate of unseen emotional faces. An attentional blink fMRI-study. (abstract)
14:00
Ingo Klaiber (Department of Psychiatry - University Ulm, Germany)
Markus Kiefer (Department of Psychiatry - University Ulm, Germany)
Theta power and the N2/P3 event-related potential complex as electrophysiological markers for cognitive control processes: A comparison between the Go/NoGo and the Flanker tasks (abstract)
14:00
Gordon Dodwell (2 Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Planegg-Martinsried, Germany, Germany)
Hermann Müller (Department of Experimental Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany, Germany)
Thomas Töllner (Department of Experimental Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany, Germany)
EEG evidence for improved visual working memory performance during standing and exercise (abstract)
14:00
Luisa Balzus (Berlin School of Mind and Brain; Institut für Psychologie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Norbert Kathmann (Institut für Psychologie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Julia Klawohn (Department of Psychology, Florida State University; Institut für Psychologie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Affective processing during action monitoring: Results from emotional priming, neural error signals, and autonomic reactivity (abstract)
14:00
Glen Forester (University of Trier, Germany)
Meike Kroneisen (University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany)
Edgar Erdfelder (Universität Mannheim, Germany)
Siri-Maria Kamp (University of Trier, Germany)
On the role of retrieval processes in the survival processing effect: Evidence from ROC and ERP analyses. (abstract)
14:00
Géza Gergely Ambrus (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany)
Daniel Kaiser (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany)
Radoslaw Martin Cichy (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany)
Gyula Kovács (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany)
The neural dynamics of familiar face recognition (abstract)
14:00
Holger Wiese (Durham University, UK)
Simone C. Tüttenberg (Durham University, UK)
A. Mike Burton (University of York, UK)
Andrew W. Young (University of York, UK)
Later but not early stages of familiar face recognition depend strongly on attentional resources: Evidence from event-related brain potentials. (abstract)
14:00
Nikolett Arató (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Darnai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Tímea Budai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Orsolya Inhóf (University of Pécs, Hungary)
András Zsidó (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Szabolcs Bandi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Beatrix Lábadi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Kata Lénárd (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gábor Perlaki (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Orsi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
József Janszky (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Cyberbullying and Neuroimaging: A task to measure cyberbullying’s neural correlates (abstract)
14:00
Andras Zsido (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Orsolya Inhof (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Szabolcs Bandi (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Nikolett Arato (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Beatrix Labadi (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gabor Perlaki (Pécs Diagnostic Centre, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Orsi (Pécs Diagnostic Centre, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Timea Budai (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Jozsef Janszky (Department of Neurology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Darnai Gergely (Institute of Psychology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
Control-related Brain System Alternations in Problematic Internet Use: an Independent Component Analysis (abstract)
14:00
Jaqueline Brieke (Institute of Medical Psychology and Systems Neuroscience, University of Münster, Germany)
Bettina Gathmann (Institute of Medical Psychology and Systems Neuroscience, University of Münster, Germany)
Thomas Straube (Institute of Medical Psychology and Systems Neuroscience, University of Münster, Germany)
Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Associative Learning in Arachnophobia (abstract)
14:00
Doris Schmid (Lehrstuhl für Klinische Neuropsychologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany)
Thomas Schenk (Lehrstuhl für Klinische Neuropsychologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany)
Exclusion of light scatter as a possible explanation for blindsight (abstract)
14:00
Theresa Halder (Klinische Neuropsychologie LMU München, Germany)
Karin Ludwig (Klinische Neuropsychologie LMU München, Germany)
Thomas Schenk (Klinische Neuropsychologie LMU München, Germany)
Binocular rivalry in congenital prosopagnosia (abstract)
14:00
Michael Weigl (Saarland University, Germany)
Ronja Thiel (Saarland University, Germany)
Timm Rosburg (University Psychiatric Clinics Basel, Switzerland)
Axel Mecklinger (Saarland University, Germany)
A comparison between distinctiveness and accentuation in the illusory correlation paradigm: An event-related potential study (abstract)
14:00
Gergely Darnai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Orsolya Inhof (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Andras Zsido (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Nikolett Arató (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Beatrix Labadi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gabor Perlaki (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Orsi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Jozsef Janszky (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Szabolcs Ajtony Bandi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Timea Budai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Language networks and internet addiction: fMRI study (abstract)
14:00
Jakob Kaiser (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Simone Schütz-Bosbach (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
The role of midfrontal theta oscillations in proactive cognitive control adjustments (abstract)
14:00
Louisa Kulke (Georg-August University Göttingen, Germany)
Annekathrin Schacht (Georg-August University Göttingen, Germany)
Late but not early Event-Related Potentials reflect emotion modulations during overt attention shifts (abstract)
14:00
Benjamin de Haas (Abt. Allgemeine Psychologie, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Germany, Germany)
‘Where’ in the ventral stream – a common gradient of spatial and face-part selectivity in the inferior occipital gyrus (abstract)
14:00
Marcel Harpaintner (Ulm University, Germany)
Eun-Jin Sim (Ulm University, Germany)
Natalie Trumpp (Ulm University, Germany)
Markus Kiefer (Ulm University, Germany)
The grounding of abstract concepts in the visual and motor system: an fMRI study (abstract)
14:00
Alba Garrido (Mind, Brain, and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC), University of Granada, Spain)
Stefan Duschek (UMIT - University of Health Sciences Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol, Austria, Austria)
Francisco Esteves (Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden, Sweden)
Jaime Vila (Mind, Brain, and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC), University of Granada, Granada, Spain, Spain)
José Luís Mata (Mind, Brain, and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC), University of Granada, Granada, Spain, Spain)
Autonomic contributions in the cardiac defense response during an external attentional task (abstract)
14:00
Orsolya Inhóf (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Szabolcs Ajtony Bandi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
András Norbert Zsidó (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Nikolett Arató (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Beatrix Lábadi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gábor Perlaki (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Orsi (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Timea Budai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
József Janszky (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Gergely Darnai (University of Pécs, Hungary)
Anxiety and language network: independent component analysis (abstract)
14:00-16:00 Session 8C: POSTER SESSION: Language

POSTER SESSION: Language

Location: TMG 47
14:00
Julia Föcker (University of Lincoln, UK)
Pavlos Topalidis (Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany)
Julia Gädeke (University of Hamburg, Germany)
Brigitte Röder (University of Hamburg, Germany)
Affective prosody processing in and outside the focus of spatial attention in congenitally blind and sighted adults (abstract)
14:00
Christopher Fust (Centre for Digital Learning and Teaching, Germany)
Bertram Opitz (Centre for Digital Learning and Teaching, Martin-Luther-University Halle, Germany)
Torsten Schubert (Department for Psychology, Martin-Luther-University Halle, Germany)
The testing effect in artificial language learning (abstract)
14:00
Teresa Schurer (Centre for Digital Learning and Teaching, Germany)
Bertram Opitz (Centre for Digital Learning and Teaching, Martin-Luther-University Halle, Germany)
Torsten Schubert (Department for Psychology, Germany)
Working memory capacity but not prior knowledge impact on readers’ attention and text comprehension (abstract)
14:00
Anna-Lisa Ndao (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Rasha Abdel Rahman (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Pienie Zwitserlood (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany)
Antje Lorenz (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Cumulative semantic interference in compound production (abstract)
14:00
Francesca Capuano (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany)
Berry Claus (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Barbara Kaup (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany)
Compatibility effects in reading-by-rotating paradigms: Different results for sentences with one character vs. two characters? (abstract)
14:00
Franziska Rück (University of Tuebingen, Germany)
Carolin Dudschig (University of Tuebingen, Germany)
Ian G. Mackenzie (University of Tuebingen, Germany)
Hartmut Leuthold (Universtiy of Tuebingen, Germany)
Barbara Kaup (University of Tuebingen, Germany)
Processing true and false negative sentences in contexts controlled for lexical associations (abstract)
14:00
Elena Albu (University of Tuebingen, Germany)
Not Known: Anonymous, Unknown or Non-known? Remarks on the Interpretation of Negated Absolute Adjectives in Romanian (abstract)
14:00
Anke Huckauf (Ulm University, Germany)
Tatjana Nazir (CNRS, France)
Naming swear words: A comparison of L1 and L2 (abstract)
14:00
Christina Kraut (UMIT the health & life science university, Austria)
Julia Bahnmüller (IWM Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien, Germany)
Silvia Pixner (UMIT the health & life science university, Austria)
Bilingual Education – A benefit for non-native speaker? (abstract)
14:00
Marietta Sionti (Bielefeld, Germany)
Thomas Schack (Bielefeld, Germany)
Kinematic features of Aktionsart (abstract)
14:00
Emanuel Schütt (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Eduard Berndt (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Guo Yu (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Barbara Kaup (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Testing an online paradigm for investigating the automatic activation of location information during word processing (abstract)
14:00
Sabrina Defren (Cognitive and Developmental Psychology & Center for Cognitive Science, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Patricia B.C. Wesseling (Cognitive and Developmental Psychology & Center for Cognitive Science, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Shanley Allen (Psycholinguistics and Language Development, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Boaz Ben-David (Communication, Aging and Neuropsychology Lab (CAN lab), The Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Israel)
Vered Shakuf (Communication, Aging and Neuropsychology Lab (CAN lab), The Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Israel)
Thomas Lachmann (Cognitive and Developmental Psychology & Center for Cognitive Science, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
The impact of prosody and semantics in emotional speech: A set of German neutral and emotionally affective sentences (abstract)
14:00
Andreas Wertgen (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Tobias Richter (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Effects of text-belief and source-message consistency on the validation of textual information (abstract)
14:00
Alexander Blunk (TU Dresden, Germany)
Rica Bönsel (TU Dresden, Germany)
Romy Müller (TU Dresden, Germany)
Understanding Question Intent in Dialogue Systems: The Impact of Explanations and Clarifications on User Behavior and Confidence (abstract)
14:00
Fritz Günther (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy)
Marco Marelli (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy)
Jens Bölte (University of Münster, Germany)
A large dataset of semantic transparency measures for German compounds (abstract)
14:00
Rebecca Weil (University of Hull, UK)
Liad Mudrik (Tel Aviv University, Israel)
When congruency matters more than validity: Sentence-content congruent primes facilitate validation (abstract)
16:30-18:00 POSTER AWARD SESSION

POSTER AWARD SESSION

Chairs:
Andreas Eder (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Carina Giesen (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany)
Location: TMG 47
16:30-19:00 Session 9A: Rethinking Source Memory and Guessing: General Mechanisms and Determinants (Symposium) (click to edit)

Rethinking Source Memory and Guessing: General Mechanisms and Determinants (Symposium)

In our everyday life, remembering the source, that is the origin of an information (e.g., who told me about the new medicine? Where did I read the latest news?), can be critical for judgement formation, and thus behavior. Source monitoring encompasses all cognitive processes that are at play whenever people attribute information to its origin including source memory (i.e., actually remembering the source of an information) and source guessing (i.e., making an educated guess in the absence of memory). Both processes can have far-reaching consequences, for example for assessing the reliability of eyewitness testimony or, more generally, for evaluating the credibility of received information. Acknowledging the importance of source memory and guessing, this symposium will specifically focus on underlying mechanisms and important influencing factors of both processes using a joint theoretical framework and mathematical modeling to disentangle memory and guessing processes. In particular, the symposium will first cover the underlying components and mechanisms of source memory and guessing, respectively. Following this, new insights from metamemory research will be provided. Finally, we will focus on the ecological relevance of source memory, with reference to its social adaptivity and behavioral consequences. Based on multinomial model analyses, experimental evidence from these multifaceted aspects of source monitoring will be presented and brought up for discussion.

Chairs:
Nikoletta Symeonidou (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Liliane Wulff (University of Mannheim, Germany)
16:30
Nikoletta Symeonidou (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Beatrice G. Kuhlmann (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Rethinking Source Memory and Guessing: General Mechanisms and Determinants (2) (abstract)
16:50
Liliane Wulff (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Beatrice G. Kuhlmann (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Rethinking Source Memory and Guessing: General Mechanisms and Determinants (3) (abstract)
17:10
Marie Luisa Schaper (Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Germany)
Beatrice G. Kuhlmann (Mannheim University, Germany)
Ute J. Bayen (Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Germany)
Rethinking Source Memory and Guessing: General Mechanisms and Determinants (4) (abstract)
17:30
Laura Mieth (Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Germany)
Jan Philipp Röer (Universität Witten-Herdecke, Germany)
Axel Buchner (Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Germany)
Raoul Bell (Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Germany)
Rethinking Source Memory and Guessing: General Mechanisms and Determinants (5) (abstract)
17:50
Meike Kroneisen (Universität Koblenz-Landau, Germany)
Rethinking Source Memory and Guessing: General Mechanisms and Determinants (6) (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 9B: Experimental Aesthetics 2 (Symposium)

Experimental Aesthetics 2 (Symposium)

This is the second part of the morning symposium on Experimental Aesthetics. Experimental Aesthetics is the second-oldest branch of Experimental Psychology. Subsequent to his Psychophysics, Gustav Theodor Fechner established the empirical, experimental study of aesthetics "from below", using empirical building blocks. Firmly grounded in the psychophysical and cognitive paradigms, the field continues to thrive. Our symposium convenes contributions investigating aesthetic domains ranging from dance, literature, music, visual arts, and more. Researchers engage in the quest for elucidating domain-general as well as highly domain-specific mental processing architecture.

Chair:
Thomas Jacobsen (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Location: GC1-08
16:30
Elvira Brattico (Center for Music in the Brain (MIB), Aarhus University, Denmark)
On the musically beautiful – Revealing the physical, physiological and psychological determinants of beauty judgments of music (abstract)
16:50
Marcus Pearce (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Aesthetic experience of music: expectation, emotion, complexity and pleasure (abstract)
17:10
Alexis Makin (University of Liverpool, UK)
The gap between aesthetic science and aesthetic experience (abstract)
17:30
Valentin Wagner (Max Planck Institute of Empirical Aesthetics, Germany)
Winfried Menninghaus (Max Planck Institute of Empirical Aesthetics, Germany)
Thomas Jacobsen (Helmut Schmidt University, Germany)
The conceptual space of aesthetic appreciation (abstract)
17:50
Julia F. Christensen (City University, UK)
Ruben T. Azevedo (Royal Holloway, UK)
Manos Tsakiris (Royal Holloway, UK)
Emotion matters: different psychophysiological responses to expressive and non-expressive dance movements (abstract)
18:10
David Poeppel (New York University, United States)
Rhythms in the signal and rhythms in the head (abstract)
18:30
Ursula Beermann (The Health and Life Sciences University - UMIT, Department of Psychology, Austria)
Melina Scheuffgen (University of Innsbruck, Department of Psychology, Austria)
Hanna Wode (University of Innsbruck, Department of Psychology, Austria)
Let Me Read You a Story: Effects of Vocal Delivery of Literary Texts and Mood on Aesthetic Emotions (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 9C: Emotion 1 (Individual Talks)

Emotion 1 (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Thomas Lachmann (TU Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Location: GCG-08
16:30
Jinhui Zhang (Institute of Psychology, University of Freiburg, Germany)
Andrea Kiesel (Institute of Psychology, University of Freiburg, Germany)
David Dignath (Institute of Psychology, University of Freiburg, Germany)
When negative affect drives attentional control: The role of motivational orientation (abstract)
16:50
Nora K. Schaal (Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Philip Hepp (Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, HELIOS University Hospital Wuppertal, University Witten/Herdecke, Germany, Germany)
The influence of listening to music during caesarean sections on patients’ anxiety levels (abstract)
17:10
Julia Baum (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Germany)
Rasha Abdel Rahman (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Germany)
Media source credibility and the impact of affective person-related information (abstract)
17:30
Judith Gerten (University of Cologne, Germany)
Sascha Topolinski (University of Cologne, Germany)
Shades of surprise? Assessing the impact of degree of deviance and schema constraints on the surprise response syndrome (abstract)
17:50
Claudia Kawai (University of Vienna, Austria)
Gáspár Lukács (University of Vienna, Austria)
Ulrich Ansorge (University of Vienna, Austria)
Polarity-Induced Interactions Between Colour and Emotion (abstract)
18:10
Vanessa Mitschke (Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Andreas Eder (Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Mario Gollwitzer (Universität München, Germany)
Effects of Emotional Facial Expressions on Revenge Punishment (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 9D: Memory (Individual Talks)

Memory (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Tilo Strobach (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Location: TM1-06
16:30
Eva-Maria Hartmann (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Alodie Rey-Mermet (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Miriam Gade (Medical School Berlin, Germany)
Same same but different? Modeling N-1 Switch Cost and N-2 Repetition Cost with the Diffusion Model and the Linear Ballistic Accumulator Model (abstract)
16:50
Tilo Strobach (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Franziska Orscheschek (Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany)
Torsten Schubert (Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany)
Timothy C. Rickard (University of California San Diego, United States)
Investigating the mechanisms of chunking during dual-memory retrieval practice (abstract)
17:10
Hartmut Blank (University of Portsmouth, UK)
Mutually contradictory post-event misinformation: Effects on eyewitness remembering (abstract)
17:30
Sebastian Scholz (University of Münster, Germany)
Stephan Dutke (University of Münster, Germany)
On the Adaptive Nature of Directed Forgetting: Recall and Eye Movement Results (abstract)
17:50
Lucas Lörch (University of Mannheim, Germany)
The magic numbers 4 and 7. Modeling chunking in immediate memory. (abstract)
18:10
Mirela Dubravac (University of Bern, Switzerland)
Beat Meier (University of Bern, Switzerland)
Cognitive Control Affects Memory for Targets and Distractors Differently: The Two Faces of Memory Selectivity (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 9E: Neuroscience (Individual Talks)

Neuroscience (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Tobias Feldmann-Wustefeld (University of Southampton, UK)
Location: TMG-58
16:30
Franz Wurm (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Wioleta Walentowska (Ghent Univeristy, Belgium)
Benjamin Ernst (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Mario Carlo Severo (Ghent University, Belgium)
Gilles Pourtois (Ghent University, Belgium)
Marco Steinhauser (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Is it important to be able to learn? An ERP study on the influence of goal relevance on feedback processing (abstract)
16:50
Anne Trutti (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Zsuzsika Sjoerds (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Bernhard Hommel (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Attentional blink and putative non-invasive dopamine markers: two experiments to consolidate possible associations (abstract)
17:10
Larissa Leist (TU Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Thomas Lachmann (TU Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Daniela Czernochowski (TU Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Task-dependent effects on error-processing (abstract)
17:30
Tobias Feldmann-Wüstefeld (University of Southampton, UK)
Neural evidence for the role of suppression in visual selective attention and working memory (abstract)
17:50
Alodie Rey-Mermet (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Miriam Gade (Medical School Berlin, Germany)
Marco Steinhauser (Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany)
Sequential conflict resolution under multiple concurrent conflicts: An ERP study (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 9F: Language (Individual Talks)

Language (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Ulrich Ansorge (University of Vienna, Austria)
Location: TM2-02
16:30
Ulrich Ansorge (University of Vienna, Austria)
Florian Engel (Medical University Vienna, Austria)
Tamara Strini (University of Vienna, Austria)
Anni Siener (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany)
An Investigation of Spatial Stimulus-Response Compatibility Effects Based on German Particles (abstract)
16:50
Ira Theresa Maschmann (University of Cologne - Social Cognition Center Cologne, Germany)
Sascha Topolinski (University of Cologne - Social Cognition Center Cologne, Germany)
Introducing a novel language preference effect: Consonantal and Vocalic Positions Affect Word Preference and Person Perception (abstract)
17:10
Felix G. Rebitschek (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
Michael Zitzmann (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany)
How to improve relative risk interpretation in readers of digital texts (abstract)
17:30
Miriam Gade (Medical School Berlin, Germany)
Andrea M. Philipp (RWTH Aachen University, Department of Psychology, Germany)
Anat Prior (University of Haifa, Edmond J. Safra Brain Research Center for the study of Learning Disabilities, Israel)
Language switching and task switching: Does superficial similarity translate into equivalent learning processes in bilinguals and monolinguals alike? (abstract)
17:50
Sascha Topolinski (University of Cologne, Germany)
Delicious language: The driving mechanisms of the in-out effect (abstract)
18:10
Jannis Born (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Nikola Nikolov (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Anna Rosenkranz (Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of Cologne, Germany)
Barbara Schmidt (Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of Cologne, Germany)
Alfred Schabmann (Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of Cologne, Germany)
A computational investigation of Jürgen Reichen's Lesen durch Schreiben method (abstract)
18:30
Jessica Ernst (Ruhr-Universität, Germany)
Eva Belke (Ruhr-Universität, Germany)
Sonia Kandel (Université, France)
The role of double consonants in German handwritten word production (abstract)
16:30-19:00 Session 9G: Semantic Context Effects on Language Production: New Perspectives and Methods (Symposium)

Semantic Context Effects on Language Production: New Perspectives and Methods (Symposium)

During language production speakers are influenced by the semantic context in which they speak. Numerous studies using experimental paradigms like the Picture-Word-Interference (PWI), the blocked-cyclic or the continuous naming paradigm, have revealed that semantic context can interfere with or facilitate language production. In this symposium we introduce novel approaches that build on established findings but employ new methods, perspectives and applications to the study of semantic context effects. Moving forward from classical PWI, Cornelia van Scherpenberg will present data on this paradigm in combination with eye tracking showing how speakers make use of the semantic context they view. Eva Belke will discuss semantic interference across languages, demonstrating how the blocked-cyclic naming paradigm can be used to assess lexical-semantic representations in Turkish-German bilingual children. Speaking in its most natural form – during social interaction and shared activities – will be addressed in two contributions. Hsin-Pei Lin will describe how seemingly unrelated objects can induce interference in naming after they are introduced in a unifying narrative told by a task partner. Anna Kuhlen will present electrophysiological and behavioural data from a social setting in which two task partners alternate naming pictures, investigating whether the partner’s word retrieval process is simulated. Finally, an innovative combination of TMS and PWI will be introduced by Katrin Sakreida, allowing insights into the spatial and temporal mapping of semantic processes in language-related cortical regions. Our symposium will provide intriguing insights on cutting-edge methodological approaches but also new theoretical facets in a thriving field of language production research.

Chairs:
Anna Katharina Kuhlen (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Cornelia van Scherpenberg (Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Germany)
Location: BPLG-02
16:30
Cornelia van Scherpenberg (Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Rasha Abdel Rahman (Institute for Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Hellmuth Obrig (Department of Neurology, Max-Planck-Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany)
Semantic Context Effects on Language Production: New Perspectives and Methods (1) (abstract)
16:50
Eva Belke (Sprachwissenschaftliche Institut, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany)
Johanna Bebout (Logopädische Praxis Heike Bagus, Plümers Kamp 10, 45276 Essen, Germany)
Semantic Context Effects on Language Production: New Perspectives and Methods (2) (abstract)
17:10
Hsin-Pei Lin (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Anna Katharina Kuhlen (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Rasha Abdel Rahman (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Semantic Context Effects on Language Production: New Perspectives and Methods (3) (abstract)
17:30
Anna Katharina Kuhlen (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Rasha Abdel Rahman (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
Semantic Context Effects on Language Production: New Perspectives and Methods (4) (abstract)
17:50
Katrin Sakreida (Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Germany)
Magdalena Jonen (Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Germany)
Marie Grünert (Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Germany)
Stefan Heim (Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Department of Psychiatry | Research Centre Jülich, INM-1, Germany)
Georg Neuloh (Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Germany)
Semantic Context Effects on Language Production: New Perspectives and Methods (5) (abstract)
18:10
Andrea M. Philipp (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Noemi Földes (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Iring Koch (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Semantic Context Effects on Language Production: New Perspectives and Methods (6) (abstract)
20:00-22:30 TEAP 2019 CONFERENCE DINNER (tickets available)

TEAP 2019 CONFERENCE DINNER (tickets available)

Location: Kenwood House
Wednesday, April 17th

View this program: with abstractssession overviewtalk overview

09:00-11:00 Session 10A: Current Trends in Implicit Learning Research (Symposium)

Current Trends in Implicit Learning Research (Symposium)

Many researchers claim that people can detect regularities in their environment and adapt behavior accordingly in the absence of awareness. However, the demonstration of such implicit (unconscious) learning hinges on participants’ unawareness of the process and products of learning or on the necessity of two cognitive processes (an automatic and a deliberative one) to explain behavior. This symposium will bring together researchers employing different paradigms and methods of investigating the possibility of unconscious learning. The first two talks will present new insights in evaluative conditioning: Mandy Hütter will show that its sensitivity to contingencies depends on the ratio of positive to negative stimulus pairings, while Christoph Stahl will provide evidence for a single-process perspective on evaluative conditioning that does not require an automatic process. In the domain of category learning, Andy Wills will present recent work on the COVIS dual-process model, showing that participants’ apparent use of implicit categorization strategies may be due to inaccurate strategy classification. Because evidence for implicit learning often requires proving the null hypothesis of zero awareness, Zoltan Dienes will show how to use Bayes factors to obtain evidence for (or against) one’s theory relative to the null. The final two talks will address the often low correlations observed between awareness and behavioral measures. Miguel Vadillo will show that low correlations in contextual cuing are biased by the reliabilities of both measures. Lastly, Simone Malejka will show that the same holds true for memory suppression and present three Bayesian models to correct for unreliability.

Chair:
Simone Malejka (University College London, UK)
09:00
Mandy Hütter (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany)
Max Ihmels (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany)
Current Trends in Implicit Learning Research (1) (abstract)
09:20
Christoph Stahl (University of Cologne, Germany)
Current Trends in Implicit Learning Research (2) (abstract)
09:40
Andy Wills (Plymouth University, UK)
Charlotte Edmunds (Warwick Business School, UK)
Fraser Milton (University of Exeter, UK)
Current Trends in Implicit Learning Research (3) (abstract)
10:00
Zoltan Dienes (University of Sussex, UK)
Current Trends in Implicit Learning Research (4) (abstract)
10:20
Miguel Vadillo (UAM, Spain)
Simone Malejka (University College London, UK)
Zoltan Dienes (University of Sussex, UK)
David Shanks (University College London, UK)
Current Trends in Implicit Learning Research (5) (abstract)
10:40
Simone Malejka (University College London, UK)
Miguel A. Vadillo (UAM, Spain)
Zoltan Dienes (University of Sussex, UK)
David R. Shanks (University College London, UK)
Current Trends in Implicit Learning Research (6) (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 10B: Visual Attention´s Three Guides (Symposium)

Visual Attention´s Three Guides (Symposium)

As soon as we open our eyes to perceive the world around us, our attention is drawn to certain stimuli in our environment. Originally, it was assumed that either bottom-up (i.e., saliency) or top-down guides (i.e., search goals) steer our attention. Bottom-up guides make it easy to spot the green apple among the oranges, whereas top-down guides help us to find the red apple among pomegranates. However, recent ideas suggest that attentional selection is likely not as black and white as initially assumed. A person´s prior experience (i.e., learning history) appears to also direct attention and distinctions between bottom-up, top-down, and experience-based processes have proven surprisingly difficult in some cases. Likely, often more than one guide steers visual attention. In this symposium, examples from a wide range of topics and methods demonstrate how these three guides affect visual attention and how difficult their differentiation may be. First, two talks, on contingent capture and crowding, assess the influence of bottom-up and top-down processes on visual attention, as well as their remarkable interactions. Then, a talk on how decision-making reflects in pupil dilation and microsaccade rates provides further evidence for an influence of top-down processes. Subsequently, two talks investigating the influences of native language and anticipated action consequences on attention indicate possible effects of selection history, while also illustrating the blurred borders between top-down and experience-based processes. The final talk aims to integrate the influence of several guides for visual attention into a model for oculomotor control levels in free-choice saccades.

Chairs:
Florian Goller (Univarsity of Vienna, Austria)
Christina Pfeuffer (University of Freiburg, Germany)
Location: GC1-08
09:00
Florian Goller (University of Vienna, Austria)
Tobias Schöberl (University of Vienna, Austria)
Ulrich Ansorge (University of Vienna, Austria)
Visual attention´s three guides 1 (abstract)
09:20
Lisa Eberhardt (Ulm University, Germany)
Anke Huckauf (Ulm University, Germany)
Visual attention´s three guides 2 (abstract)
09:40
Christoph Strauch (Ulm University, Germany)
Anke Huckauf (Ulm University, Germany)
Visual attention´s three guides 3 (abstract)
10:00
Alexandra Kroiss (University of Vienna, Austria)
Florian Goller (University of Vienna, Austria)
Jeong-Ah Shin (Dongguk University, South Korea)
Ulrich Ansorge (University of Vienna, Austria)
Soonja Choi (University of Vienna, Austria)
Visual attention´s three guides 4 (abstract)
10:20
Christina Pfeuffer (University of Freiburg, Germany)
Visual attention´s three guides 5 (abstract)
10:40
Lynn Huestegge (Wuerzburg University, Germany)
Aleks Pieczykolan (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
Oliver Herbort (Wuerzburg University, Germany)
Wilfried Kunde (Wuerzburg University, Germany)
Nora Gosch (TU Braunschweig, Germany)
Visual attention´s three guides 6 (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 10C: Morals (Individual Talks)

Morals (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Michael Zürn (University of Cologne, Germany)
Location: TM2-02
09:00
Alex Wiegmann (Ruhr University Bochum, Germany)
Lying, what is said, presuppositions, and implicatures (abstract)
09:20
Felix J. Götz (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Andreas B. Eder (Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Obedience vs. free will: Adaption of a bug-killing paradigm for the study of obedience to authority (abstract)
09:40
Neele Engelmann (Department of Psychology, University of Göttingen, Germany)
Michael Waldmann (Department of Psychology, University of Göttingen, Germany)
Moral Reasoning with Multiple Effects (abstract)
10:00
Michael Zürn (University of Cologne, Germany)
Sascha Topolinski (University of Cologne, Germany)
Cooperation in Asymmetric Dilemmas (abstract)
10:20
Alexa Weiss (Bielefeld, Germany)
Pascal Burgmer (University of Kent, UK)
Double moral standards in close relationships (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 10D: Feedback (Individual Talks)

Feedback (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Bertram Opitz (Martin Luther University Halle, Germany)
Location: GCG-08
09:00
Bertram Opitz (Centre for Digital Learning and Teaching, Germany)
Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying Formative Feedback (abstract)
09:20
Petra Ludowicy (Center for Cognitive Science, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Pedro Paz-Alonso (Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language, San Sebastian, Spain)
Thomas Lachmann (Center for Cognitive Science, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Daniela Czernochowski (Center for Cognitive Science, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
The Effect of Performance Feedback on the Testing Effect (abstract)
09:40
Aleksandra Krogulska (The University of Warwick, UK)
Kinga Izdebska (Jagiellonian University, Poland)
Maciej Hanczakowski (SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poland)
Katarzyna Zawadzka (SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poland)
The memory conformity effect in semantic memory. How does information from other people influence answering general knowledge questions? (abstract)
10:00
Kathrin C. J. Eschmann (Saarland University, Germany)
Axel Mecklinger (Saarland University, Germany)
You’ve got the power: Frontal-midline theta neurofeedback training and its transfer to cognitive control processes (abstract)
10:20
Kerstin Fröber (Universität Regensburg, Germany)
Roland Pfister (Universität Würzburg, Germany)
Gesine Dreisbach (Universität Regensburg, Germany)
Increasing reward prospect promotes cognitive flexibility: Direct evidence from voluntary task switching with double registration (abstract)
10:40
Romy Müller (TU Dresden, Faculty of Psychology, Chair of Engineering Psychology and Applied Cognitive Research, Germany)
Partner reactions affect task set selection: The roles of specific imitation and abstract task set compatibility (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 10E: Methodology (Individual Talks)

Methodology (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Jochen Musch (University of Duesseldorf, Germany)
Location: TM1-06
09:00
Julia Meisters (University of Duesseldorf, Germany)
Adrian Hoffmann (University of Duesseldorf, Germany)
Jochen Musch (University of Duesseldorf, Germany)
The Extended Crosswise Model: Validating an experimental approach to controlling social desirability (abstract)
09:20
Joerg Beringer (BeriSoft Inc., United States)
Leigh Charvet (MS Comprehensive Care Center, Department of Neurology, NYU School of Medicine, United States)
Stephen D. Goldinger (Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, United States)
Michael Shaw (MS Comprehensive Care Center, Department of Neurology, NYU School of Medicine, United States)
Using Cognition Lab to bridge between ‘in-lab’ and lab-external studies (abstract)
09:40
Dominik Bach (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Filip Melinscak (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Stephen Fleming (University College London, UK)
Manuel Voelkle (Humboldt-Universität Berlin, Germany)
Retrodictive validity as rational criterion for choice of psychological research methods (abstract)
10:00
Martin Papenberg (University of Duesseldorf, Department of Experimental Psychology, Germany)
Gunnar W. Klau (University of Duesseldorf, Department of Computer Science, Germany)
Using anticlustering to create equivalent stimulus sets in experimental psychology (abstract)
10:20
Martin Schnuerch (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Efficiently testing sensitive attributes: A sequential randomized response technique (abstract)
10:40
Markus Steiner (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Florian Seitz (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Renato Frey (University of Basel and Princeton University, Switzerland)
Mapping the Cognitive Processes Underlying Self-Reported Risk-Taking Propensity (abstract)
09:00-11:00 Session 10F: Can imitation, observation, and joint action be socially modulated? A cross-paradigm & meta-analytical perspective (Symposium)

Can imitation, observation, and joint action be socially modulated?  A cross-paradigm & meta-analytical perspective (Symposium)

In the last decades, social phenomena including automatic imitation, observational learning, and joint action and their underlying psychological processes became “hot” topics in scientific psychological research. Thus, researchers developed social variants of prominent cognitive paradigms, such as the joint Simon task, the observational stimulus-response binding paradigm, or the imitation-inhibition task—to name just a few examples. These paradigms not only allow for studying the cognitive underpinnings of social key topics. Also, they are particularly insightful, because their findings challenge the explanatory power of (so far) purely cognitive accounts. Evidence for the social nature of these paradigms comes from studies that test the influence of certain “social” moderators (group membership, interdependence, etc.). Strikingly, at the backdrop of the current crisis of confidence in psychological research, a critical examination on the robustness of these moderating effects is currently missing. In this symposium, we aim at filling this gap by critically assessing the degree to which social moderators actually influence social variants of prominent cognitive paradigms (joint Simon task; imitation-inhibition task; observational stimulus-response binding task). All contributors will explain the nature of each paradigm and review recent evidence. Specifically, all contributors commit to a meta-analytical approach and will unpack their “social file drawer” and present data on social factors that did or did not moderate the effect of interest. This paves the way for an in-depth discussion of possible underlying psychological processes that are common to all of the presented effects and come with high explanatory power across all of these paradigms.

Chairs:
Oliver Genschow (University of Cologne, Germany)
Carina Giesen (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany)
Location: BPLG-02
09:00
Oliver Genschow (University of Cologne, Germany)
Can imitation, observation, and joint action be socially modulated? A cross-paradigm & meta-analytical perspective (2) (abstract)
09:20
Roman Liepelt (German Sport University Cologne, Germany)
Markus Raab (German Sport University Cologne, Germany)
Can imitation, observation, and joint action be socially modulated? A cross-paradigm & meta-analytical perspective (3) (abstract)
09:40
Pamela Baess (University of Hildesheim, Germany)
Can imitation, observation, and joint action be socially modulated? A cross-paradigm & meta-analytical perspective (4) (abstract)
10:00
Carina Giesen (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany)
Can imitation, observation, and joint action be socially modulated? A cross-paradigm & meta-analytical perspective (5) (abstract)
10:20
Emiel Cracco (Ghent University, Belgium)
Laura De Souter (Ghent University, Belgium)
Senne Braem (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium)
Oliver Genschow (University of Cologne, Germany)
Marcel Brass (Ghent University, Belgium)
Can imitation, observation, and joint action be socially modulated? A cross-paradigm & meta-analytical perspective (6) (abstract)
13:00-14:00 Free EYELINK Bring-Your-Lunch Workshop (36 places, please register with kurt@sr-research.com)

Free EYELINK Lunch Workshop (36 places, please register with kurt@sr-research.com)

Location: TM3-01
13:00-14:00 Free Berisoft Bring-Your-Lunch Workshop: Introduction to the ERTS Script Language (30 places, please register with joerg.beringer@berisoft.com)

Free Berisoft Lunch Workshop: Introduction to the ERTS Script Language (30 places, please register with joerg.beringer@berisoft.com)

Location: TM3-02
14:00-16:00 Session 12A: Uncovering Cognitive Processes using Mouse-tracking: Novel extensions and Applications (Symposium)

Uncovering Cognitive Processes using Mouse-tracking: Novel extensions and Applications (Symposium)

Mouse-tracking – the recording and analysis of mouse movements while participants decide between different options presented as buttons on a computer screen – is becoming a popular process tracing method in psychological research. Typically, mouse movements are used as an indicator of commitment to or conflict between choice options during the decision process. Based on this assumption, researchers have employed mouse-tracking to gain a closer understanding of real-time cognitive processing in many psychological domains. This symposium pursues three goals. First, we introduce mouse-tracking to interested experimental psychologists, outlining the theoretical assumptions behind the method and introducing technical implementations. One talk will present a new software package for conducting mouse-tracking experiments online (Henninger). A further talk presents an R package for performing advanced analyses and visualizations of mouse-tracking data (Kieslich). Second, the symposium presents novel applications of mouse-tracking. This includes one of the first applications of mouse-tracking within clinical populations that investigates social perception in Borderline Personality Disorder (Hepp) and exemplary applications in the other talks, including decisions under risk, social dilemmas and judgmental biases. Third, the symposium presents methodological extensions of mouse-tracking. This includes the combination of eye- and mouse-tracking to jointly model information acquisition and evaluation (Frame). A further talk presents different methods for identifying changes of mind and compares their validity in several experiments (Palfi). The symposium will end with a panel discussion of all speakers that will discuss methodological challenges and future directions for mouse-tracking research. The discussion will take place from 15:40-16:00 (not displayed in program).

Chair:
Pascal J. Kieslich (University of Mannheim, Germany)
14:00
Felix Henninger (University of Koblenz-Landau, University of Mannheim, Germany)
Pascal J. Kieslich (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Uncovering cognitive processes using mouse-tracking: Novel extensions and applications 1 (abstract)
14:20
Pascal J. Kieslich (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Dirk U. Wulff (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Felix Henninger (University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany)
Jonas M. B. Haslbeck (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Michael Schulte-Mecklenbeck (University of Bern, Switzerland)
Uncovering cognitive processes using mouse-tracking: Novel extensions and applications 2 (abstract)
14:40
Johanna Hepp (Central Institute of Mental Health, Heidelberg University, Germany)
Pascal J. Kieslich (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Inga Niedtfeld (Central Institute of Mental Health, Heidelberg University, Germany)
Uncovering cognitive processes using mouse-tracking: Novel extensions and applications 3 (abstract)
15:00
Mary Frame (Wright State University, United States)
Alan Boydstun (Wright State University, United States)
Joseph Houpt (Wright State University, United States)
Uncovering cognitive processes using mouse-tracking: Novel extensions and applications 4 (abstract)
15:20
Bence Palfi (University of Sussex, UK)
Pascal J. Kieslich (University of Mannheim, Germany)
Barnabas Szaszi (ELTE Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary)
Dirk U. Wulff (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Balazs Aczel (ELTE Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary)
Uncovering cognitive processes using mouse-tracking: Novel extensions and applications 5 (abstract)
14:00-16:00 Session 12B: Testing Your Memory: Current research on the Forward Testing Effect and the Benefits of Unsuccessful Retrieval (Symposium)

Testing Your Memory: Current research on the Forward Testing Effect and the Benefits of Unsuccessful Retrieval (Symposium)

Testing can have a number of beneficial effects on long-term memory and learning. For instance, a direct benefit of testing, referred to as the backward testing effect in the literature, is the finding that retrieval practice of previously studied information can improve its long-term retention more than restudy does. However, there are also indirect benefits of testing, including the forward testing effect and the benefits of unsuccessful retrieval. The forward testing effect describes the finding that retrieval practice of previously studied information enhances learning and retention of subsequently studied other information. The benefits of unsuccessful retrieval refer to the finding that generating errors in impossible recall tests can enhance subsequent feedback learning and thus improve long-term memory. The speakers of the symposium will present their ongoing research on the forward testing effect and the benefits of unsuccessful retrieval, addressing both theoretical and practical aspects of these effects. So doing, the symposium will directly connect with the keynote "Testing your memory: The many consequences of retrieval on long-term learning and retention" presented by David Shanks. The symposium will end with a panel discussion on the effects of testing on memory and learning, moderated by keynote speaker David Shanks.

Chairs:
Bernhard Pastötter (University of Trier, Germany)
David Shanks (University College London, UK)
Location: GC1-08
14:00
Bernhard Pastötter (University of Trier, Germany)
Christian Frings (University of Trier, Germany)
Testing your memory: Current research on the forward testing effect and the benefits of unsuccessful retrieval (1) (abstract)
14:20
Oliver Kliegl (Regensburg University, Germany)
Karl-Heinz T. Bäuml (Regensburg University, Germany)
Testing your memory: Current research on the forward testing effect and the benefits of unsuccessful retrieval (2) (abstract)
14:40
Veit Kubik (Institut für Psychologie, Germany)
Torsten Schubert (Institut für Psychologie, Germany)
Alp Aslan (Institut für Psychologie, Germany)
Testing your memory: Current research on the forward testing effect and the benefits of unsuccessful retrieval (3) (abstract)
15:00
Alp Aslan (Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany)
Veit Kubik (Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany)
Testing your memory: Current research on the forward testing effect and the benefits of unsuccessful retrieval (4) (abstract)
15:20
Tina Seabrooke (University of Plymouth, UK)
Tim Hollins (University of Plymouth, UK)
Andy Wills (University of Plymouth, UK)
Chris Mitchell (University of Plymouth, UK)
Testing your memory: Current research on the forward testing effect and the benefits of unsuccessful retrieval (5) (abstract)
15:40
David Shanks (University College London, UK)
Testing your memory: Current research on the forward testing effect and the benefits of unsuccessful retrieval (6) (abstract)
14:00-16:00 Session 12C: Emotion 2 (Individual Talks)

Emotion 2 (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Thomas Lachmann (TU Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Location: GCG-08
14:00
Matthias Beggiato (Chemnitz University of Technology, Cognitive and Engineering Psychology, Germany)
Franziska Hartwich (Chemnitz University of Technology, Cognitive and Engineering Psychology, Germany)
Katharina Simon (Chemnitz University of Technology, Ergonomics and Innovation Management, Germany)
Patrick Roßner (Chemnitz University of Technology, Ergonomics and Innovation Management, Germany)
Angelika Bullinger-Hoffmann (Chemnitz University of Technology, Ergonomics and Innovation Management, Germany)
Josef Krems (Chemnitz University of Technology, Cognitive and Engineering Psychology, Germany)
Psychophysiological reactions to discomfort in automated driving (abstract)
14:20
Ulrike Zimmer (MSH Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Mortatha Al Khafage (MSH Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Marlene Pacharra (MSH Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Philipp Bremer (MSH Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Spatial and emotional ERP-effects in multisensory emotional face/sound-cueing (abstract)
14:40
Adrian von Muhlenen (The University of Warwick, UK)
Lauren Bellaera (University of Massachusetts Lowell, United States)
The Effect of induced sadness and moderate depression on attentional control (abstract)
15:00
Thorsten Erle (University of Cologne, Germany)
Friederike Funk (University of Cologne, Germany)
When it helps and hurts to walk in someone else’s shoes: Effects of visuo-spatial perspective-taking on emotion recognition, perception, and emotional contagion (abstract)
15:20
Ann-Kathrin Beck (University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Joana C. Carmo (Universidade de Lisboa, Germany)
Daniela Czernochowski (University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Thomas Lachmann (University of Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Malfunctioning feedback loop during ultra-rapid item categorization in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (abstract)
14:00-16:00 Session 12D: Executive Functioning: Control (Individual Talks)

Executive Functioning: Control (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Robert Wirth (Würzburg University, Germany)
Location: BPLG-02
14:00
Maximilian Wolkersdorfer (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Sven Panis (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Thomas Schmidt (Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany)
Temporal Dynamics of Response Activation in the Stroop and Reverse-Stroop Paradigm (abstract)
14:20
Roel van Dooren (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Roberta Sellaro (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Bernhard Hommel (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Shifting the balance: The role of context in shaping metacontrol policies. (abstract)
14:40
Lea Johannsen (Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany)
Andrea Kiesel (Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany)
Bernhard Hommel (Leiden University, Germany)
David Dignath (Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany)
Contextual Control of Conflict: Reconciling Cognitive-Control and Episodic-Retrieval Accounts of Sequential Conflict Modulation (abstract)
15:00
Torsten Martiny-Huenger (UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway)
Deliberation decreases the likelihood of expressing dominant responses (abstract)
15:20
Christiane Baumann (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
Henrik Singmann (The University of Warwick, UK)
Samuel Gershman (Harvard University, United States)
Bettina von Helversen (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
A Linear Threshold Model for Optimal Stopping Problems (abstract)
15:40
Robert Wirth (Würzburg University, Germany)
Wilfried Kunde (Würzburg University, Germany)
Monitoring of proximal and distal effects and errors (abstract)
14:00-16:00 Session 12E: Attention (Individual Talks)

Attention (Individual Talks)

Chair:
Karin Ludwig (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
Location: TM2-02
14:00
Karin Ludwig (Clinical Neuropsychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany)
Thomas Schenk (Clinical Neuropsychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany)
Gaze-contingent paradigm changes bias in spatial attention in healthy observers: an intervention with potential to treat patients with spatial neglect (abstract)
14:20
Maria Glaser (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
André Knops (University Paris Descartes; CNRS UMR 8240, Laboratoire de Psychologie du Développement et de l'Éducation de l'enfant, France)
Spatial biases induced by mental arithmetic and the impact of task difficulty (abstract)
14:40
Michel D. Druey (Universität Konstanz, FB Psychologie, Germany)
Annabelle Walle (Universität Konstanz, FB Psychologie, Germany)
Ronald Hübner (Universität Konstanz, FB Psychologie, Germany)
The effects of value on attention in search tasks: Opposing mechanisms of search efficiency and response caution (abstract)
15:00
Benjamin Schöne (Osnabrueck University, Germany)
Sophia Sylvester (Osnabrueck University, Germany)
Elise L. Radtke (Osnabrueck University, Germany)
Thomas Gruber (Osnabrueck University, Germany)
Debunking the monkey: Sustained inattentional blindness in virtual reality (abstract)
15:20
Anne Jensen (Universität Trier, Germany)
Simon Merz (Universität Trier, Germany)
Charles Spence (University of Oxford, UK)
Christian Frings (Universität Trier, Germany)
Perception versus action: Processing level of distractor interference in multisensory selection (abstract)
15:40
Svantje Tabea Kähler (Helmut-Schmidt-University/ University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Mike Wendt (Medical School Hamburg, Germany)
Aquiles Luna-Rodriguez (Helmut-Schmidt-University/ University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Thomas Jacobsen (Helmut-Schmidt-University/ University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany)
Persistence and replacement of attentional sets (abstract)
16:00-17:00 Session 13: Farewell and Address of the Organiser of the TEAP2020 in Jena

Farewell and Address of the Organiser of the TEAP2020 in Jena

Chair:
Chris Lange-Kuettner (London Metropolitan University, UK)