LAGB 2024: ANNUAL MEETING OF THE LINGUISTICS ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND
PROGRAM

Days: Tuesday, August 27th Wednesday, August 28th Thursday, August 29th Friday, August 30th

Tuesday, August 27th

View this program: with abstractssession overviewtalk overview

09:00-17:00 Session 1: Summer School

09:45-10:00

Welcome and registration

10:00-11:00

Evaluating Large Language Models as LinguistsDr Itamar Kastner (University of Edinburgh)

11:00-11:15

Break

11:15-12:00

Meaning and Mathematics in Artificial IntelligenceRepresentatives from Unlikely AI

12:00-12:15

Title TBCDr Heather Burnett (Research Director, Formal Linguistics Laboratory, Paris Diderot University)

13:15-14:00

Lunch

14:00-15:30

Perspectives in Language AcquisitionProf Silvina Montrul (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign) and Prof Ben Ambridge (University of Manchester)

15:30-15:45

Break

15:45-17:00

Inferential Statistics for Linguists: Revealing Underlying Mechanisms and Making Them Work for YouDr Lauren Ackerman (Research Associate and LingLab Manager, Newcastle University)

17:15-18:00

Break

17:15-18:30

Careers Talks:(1) A Career After Linguistics: Perspectives from graduates - Dr Ben Naismith (Senior Assessment Scientist from Duolingo), Anthony Verardi(Research Program Manager from Duolingo), Noriyasu Li (Principal Product Manager from Moderna), and Tynisha Brice (Assistant Director for International Career Development from Davidson College)(2) Getting Career Opportunities at a Linguistics Student - Dr. Abdesalam Soudi (Project Manager of Humanities @ Work in the Community, Health & Tech Industries from University of Pittsburgh)

18:30

Informal social gathering 

Chair:
Gianluca Porta (Ulster University, UK)
Wednesday, August 28th

View this program: with abstractssession overviewtalk overview

10:00-12:00 Session 4A: Themed Session: Heritage Languages in the UK (1/2)
10:00
Denise Amankwah (University of Essex, UK)
Katie Howard (University of Exeter, UK)
“English on a pedestal”: the language attitudes and practices of African migrant bilingual parents and early years professionals in the U.K
10:30
Shijia Yang (University of Sheffield, UK)
Kook-Hee Gil (University of Sheffield, UK)
Anaphora resolution and crosslinguistic influence in heritage Mandarin Chinese
10:00-12:00 Session 4B
10:00
Ryan Walter Smith (University of Manchester, UK)
Growth and Improvement: a quality semantics for result state nominals
10:30
Buhan Guo (University of York, UK)
Nino Grillo (University of York, UK)
Sven Mattys (University of York, UK)
Shayne Sloggett (University of York, UK)
Andrea Santi (University College London, UK)
Giuseppina Turco (Laboratoire de Linguistique Formelle - Université Paris Cité/CNRS, France)
On the incremental semantic processing of Tense Harmony
11:00
E Jamieson (University of York, UK)
On prepositions in Whalsay, Shetland
11:30
Victoria Noble (University of York, UK)
George Tsoulas (University of York, UK)
Retiring the Universal Grinder
10:00-12:00 Session 4C
10:00
Juliette van Steensel (University College London, UK)
Dutch Sign Language Does Not Have Syllables: The C-Centre Effect in Sign
10:30
Lydia Wiernik (University of Edinburgh, UK)
The Influence of Signed Language Acquisition on Cognitive Strategies for Visuospatial Perspective-Taking (ULAB Presentation Prize Winner)
11:00
Hannah Lutzenberger (University of Tilburg, Netherlands)
Neil Fox (University of Birmingham, UK)
Heidi Proctor (University of Birmingham, UK)
Adam Schembri (University of Birmingham, UK)
Seeing signs of morphology: form-meaning relations in British Sign Language morphology is iconic for hearing non-signers
11:30
Chris Golston (California State University, Fresno, United States)
Christian Paulsen (Fresno City College, United States)
The tonology of Ancient Greek
10:00-12:00 Session 4D
10:00
Lu Jin (University of York, UK)
Shiyang Fu (University of York, UK)
Exploring the Semblance and Discrepancies between Simplex and Complex Numerals in Mandarin-Chinese
10:30
Shiyang Fu (University of York, UK)
Norman Yeo (University of York, UK)
Licensing Wh-fronting in Mandarin Chinese
11:00
Yaqing Hu (University of Southern California, United States)
How to Access Degrees? A New Look at Chinese Adjectival bi-Comparatives
15:00-16:30 Session 6A
15:00
Natalia Pavlovskaya (Newcastle University, UK)
Nick Riches (Newcastle University, UK)
Investigating the Influence of Sonority Sequencing Principle and Phonotactic Frequencies on Words Recognition
15:30
Tomek Łuszczek (University of Warsaw, Poland)
Modelling Polish glides: non-standard OT constraints are inadequate
16:00
Clara Cuonzo (University of Maryland, United States)
Accounting for the Generalised Template Theory in Precedence Based Phonology
15:00-16:30 Session 6B
15:00
Aldo Berrios Castillo (University of Edinburgh, UK)
From regular phonology to irregular morphology: A study of root-alternation in Mapudungun -(ɨ)m causatives
15:30
Danfeng Wu (University of Oxford, UK)
Allomorphy of ‘one’ and ‘two’ in Mandarin Chinese
16:00
Akhilesh Kakolu Ramarao (Heinrich-Heine-University, Germany)
Kevin Tang (Heinrich-Heine-University, Germany)
Dinah Baer-Henney (Heinrich-Heine-University, Germany)
A computational approach to understanding the cognitive reality of morphomic patterns: The case of L-shaped morphomes in Spanish
15:00-16:30 Session 6C
15:00
Benjamin Molineaux (The University of Edinburgh, UK)
‘Phoneme Fluctuation’ in low-resource languages: Theoretical problems and practical prospects
15:30
Ryan Walter Smith (University of Manchester, UK)
Ryoichiro Kobayashi (Tokyo University of Agriculture, Japan)
Non-intersective modification requires deverbal derivation: evidence from Japanese
16:00
Fangning Ren (Univerisity of Cambridge, UK)
Demarcating two variants of wh-ex-situ: evidence from Mandarin resumption-triggered weak crossover obviation
15:00-16:30 Session 6D: Themed Session: Heritage Languages in the UK (2/2)
15:00
Jonathan Kasstan (University of Westminster, UK)
Michelle Sheehan (Newcastle University, UK)
Anand Syea (University of Westminster, UK)
An exploratory study of morphosyntactic change in Chagossian Creole
15:30
Michelle Sheehan (Newcastle University, UK)
Liam Garside (Newcastle University, UK)
Ioanna Sitaridou (University of Cambridge, UK)
Pronoun use in bilingual Portuguese: preliminary findings
16:00
Farah Bi Nazir (University of York, UK)
Awais Hussain (University of York, UK)
Sehrish Hussain (Mirpur University, Pakistan)
Sam Hellmuth (University of York, UK)
What’s in a name: language and identity among the British Mirpuri Community
Thursday, August 29th

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09:00-11:00 Session 8A
Chair:
Norman Yeo (University of York, UK)
09:00
Gianluca Porta (Ulster University, UK)
When to extract from English temporal clauses
09:30
Harry Cook (University of York, UK)
A Parameter Hierarchy for Long-Distance Anaphora
10:00
Setayesh Dashti (University of Oxford, UK)
The only two stative simplex verbs in Persian and their interactions with viewpoint aspect
10:30
Theodora Alexopoulou (University of Cambridge, UK)
Kook-Hee Gil (University of Sheffield, UK)
George Tsoulas (University of York, UK)
Why not Color Agreement?
09:00-11:00 Session 8B
09:00
Thomas Hammond (University of Sheffield, UK)
Kook-Hee Gil (University of Sheffield, UK)
L2 knowledge at the initial state: Chunking, derivational complexity and L1 transfer in the production of French question forms
09:30
Balthazar Lauzon (Ulster University, UK)
Raffaella Folli (University of Ulster, UK)
Christina Sevdali (University of Ulster, UK)
Juliana Gerard (Ulster University, UK)
Auxiliary selection in French acquisition: Third-for-first person extensions and the role of input
10:00
Zsuzsanna Bárkányi (The Open University, UK)
Zoltán G. Kiss (ELTE, Hungary)
Individual differences in the acquisition of voicing related processes in multilingual speech
10:30
Davide Di Prete (University College London, UK)
Textsetting (mis)alignment in the metrics of Italian pop and rap
09:00-11:00 Session 8C
09:00
Liliane Haegeman (DIALING, Ghent University, Belgium)
Styling the character: subject drop in Agatha Christie
09:30
Marie Flesch (LLF, CNRS-Université Paris Cité, France)
Julie Abbou (Università di Torino, Italy)
Heather Burnett (LLF, CNRS-Université Paris Cité, France)
A quantitative study of person- and identity-centered language in French
10:00
Ayumi Matsuo (Kobe College, Japan)
Fuka Tsutano (Kobe College, Japan)
How language choice affects the encoding of complex motion events
10:30
Nigel Duffield (Konan University, Japan)
Ayumi Matsuo (Kobe College, Japan)
Trang Phan (Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Italy)
‘…The old man knows the exceptions’: comparing Japanese and Vietnamese L2 learners' sensitivity to partial rules in English wh-questions.
11:30-12:30 Session 9: Poster Session
11:30
Savio Meyase (University of York, UK)
Michael Ramsammy (University of Edinburgh, UK)
Tonal and laryngeal contrast in Jokha Tenyidie
11:35
Susan Lu (University College London, UK)
Gradient Phonotactics in Rotokas
11:40
Lauren Ackerman (Newcastle University, UK)
Name Explorer App: A Resource for Rigorous and Replicable Stimulus Design
11:45
Keisuke Kume (Nagoya University, Japan)
Heather Marsden (University of York, UK)
Acceptability judgement satiation after sentence processing task: Evidence from Japanese
11:50
Christianna Antonopoulou (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)
Vassilios Spyropoulos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)
A typology of coordinate compound structures with special reference to Greek
11:55
Yiwei Si (University of Oxford, UK)
Still a preposition: on aspectual properties of verbal particles in German
12:00
Clare Patterson (University of Cologne, Germany)
Andrew Kehler (University of California San Diego, United States)
Petra B. Schumacher (University of Cologne, Germany)
Interpretation Strategies for Complex Anaphora
12:05
Izabel Ilie (University College London, UK)
Juliette van Steensel (University College London, UK)
Andrew Lamont (University College London, UK)
Sticking point: Structural Optimality cannot model tone bunnies
12:10
Fumio Mohri (Fukuoka University, Japan)
Reduplicated plural nouns in Japanese and their ‘many’ readings
12:15
Natalia Pavlovskaya (Newcastle University, UK)
Evidence from an eye-tracking study on the representation of the receptive language of bilinguals
13:30-15:30 Session 10A: Education Session (Note that this session commences at 2pm.)

Note that this session commences at 2pm. 

13:30
Rowena Kasprowicz (University of Reading, UK)
Suzanne Graham (University of Reading, UK)
Hannah Davidson (University of Reading, UK)
Motivational differences among young language learners (Chair: Janet Lloyd – Primary Languages Network)
14:00
Leanne Henderson (Queen’s University, Belfast, UK)
Revisiting ‘choice’ in secondary language learning from the perspectives of young people (Chair: Janette Swainston – Longsands Academy)
14:30
Alice Corr (Birmingham University, UK)
Anna Havinga (University of Bristol, UK)
Jonathan R. Kasstan (University of Westminster, UK)
Norma Schifano (Birmingham University, UK)
Sascha Stollhans (University of Leeds, UK)
Michelle Sheehan (Newcastle University, UK)
A manifesto for change: how linguistics can help with the languages crisis (Chair: Sally Conroy – Cardinal Newman)
13:30-15:30 Session 10B
13:30
Elena Anagnostopoulou (University of Crete, Greece)
Morgan Macleod (Ulster University, UK)
Christina Sevdali (Ulster University, UK)
Possessors and Possessor Passivisation in the History of Greek
14:00
Savio Meyase (University of York, UK)
A comparative study of the Tenyidie (Angami) languages
14:30
Sora Heng Yin (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Kathleen McCarthy (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Adam Chong (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Neutralization and homophony avoidance is gradient: Evidence from artificial grammar learning
15:00
Patrick Elliott (Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany)
Mixed polarity pluralities
13:30-15:30 Session 10C
13:30
Aimee Herubin (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Phonetic variation as a function of sexual orientation in queer women in Wellington, New Zealand
14:00
Johannes Heim (University of Aberdeen, UK)
Maryam Bala (University of Aberdeen, UK)
Arabella Sinclair (University of Aberdeen, UK)
Exploring caregiver intervention on early question-answer sequences
14:30
Rana Almbark (University of York, UK)
Latifa Alkuwaiz (Imam Abdulrahman bin Faisal University, UK)
Leah Sternefeld (University of Oxford, UK)
Christopher Lucas (SOAS University of London, UK)
Georgina Brown (Lancaster University, UK)
Sam Hellmuth (University of York, UK)
Mapping Syrian Arabic dialects in diaspora
15:00
Anna Laoide-Kemp (University of Edinburgh, UK)
Resolving the spell-out timing paradox in Irish historic tense lenition
Friday, August 30th

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09:00-11:00 Session 12A
09:00
Aljosa Milenkovic (Harvard University, United States)
Andrew Nevins (University College London, UK)
Timing matters: Remorphologization in the Šatrovački language game
09:30
Liam Garside (Newcastle University, UK)
Daniel Duncan (Newcastle University, UK)
Tyneside English is giving (me/us) variation in structural case
10:00
Anna Paradis (University of Oxford, UK)
Marc Olivier (University of Oxford, UK)
Auxiliary switch, clitic climbing, null subjects: A ménage à trois in Catalano-/Occitano-/Gallo-Romance
09:00-11:00 Session 12B
09:00
Francesca Ziegler (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Identifying inflection classes in the Shilluk nominal number marking system
09:30
Luke Adamson (Leibniz-Zentrum Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft, Germany)
Gender Allosemy and Neuter Interpretation in Greek
10:00
Luke Adamson (Leibniz-Zentrum Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft, Germany)
Artemis Alexiadou (Leibniz-Zentrum Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft, Germany)
Elena Anagnostopoulou (University of Crete, Greece)
The Neuter Kinship Puzzle in Greek: On Gender, Number, and Ellipsis
09:00-11:00 Session 12C
09:00
Hilary Wynne (University of Oxford, UK)
Sandra Kotzor (University of Oxford, UK)
Beinan Zhou (University of Oxford, UK)
Aditi Lahiri (University of Oxford, UK)
Orthographic and Phonological Effects on Delayed Processing of Affixed Words
09:30
Giulia Mazzola (Newcastle University, UK)
Processing constraints in competition: a case study of syndetic and asyndetic complements in Spanish
10:00
Liliana Nentcheva (University College London (UCL), UK)
Andrea Santi (University College London (UCL), UK)
Mind the Gap: Subject Filled-Gap Effects Co-occur with Intermediate Trace Processing
10:30
Anna Bondaruk (John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland)
The syntax of existential unaccusative verbs in Polish
09:00-11:00 Session 12D: Themed Session: The Philosophy of Linguistics (1/1)
09:00
Rory Turnbull (Newcastle University, UK)
Indeterminacy in phonological psycholinguistics
09:30
Itamar Kastner (University of Edinburgh, UK)
On the philosophy of teaching linguistics
10:00
Fae Hicks (University of Edinburgh, UK)
All Data is Bad Data: modelling grammar from learner to linguist
10:30
James Miller (University of Durham, UK)
On the Metaphysics of Grammar
11:30-13:00 Session 13A
11:30
Beth Chan (National University of Singapore, Singapore)
Zheng Shen (National University of Singapore, Singapore)
Backgrounded Constructions are Islands for wh-movement but not for wh-in-situ
12:00
Laura Bailey (University of Kent, UK)
Bronwyn Bjorkman (Queen's University at Kingston, Canada)
Kirby Conrod (Swarthmore College, United States)
Caitl Light (Loyola University Chicago, United States)
A knack for syntax? Instructor attitudes to syntax teaching
12:30
T. R. Williamson (UWE, UK)
Frances Dowle (University of Oxford, UK)
Open Questions in Linguistics: An Interactive Session on the Future of UK Linguistics (abstract)
11:30-13:00 Session 13B
11:30
Ghada Alkuwaihes (IMAM ABDULRAHMAN BIN FAISAL UNIVERSITY, Saudi Arabia)
Syntactic Properties and Functions of the C-Particle qid in Saudi Arabic
12:00
Imke Driemel (Humboldt-University Berlin, Germany)
Abigail Bimpeh (Leibniz-Centre ZAS, Germany)
Reginald Duah (Humboldt-University Berlin, Germany)
`say'-clauses in subject position: observations from Kwa languages
12:30
Kajsa Djarv (University of Edinburgh, UK)
Donka Farkas (UC Santa Cruz, United States)
The licensing-conditions on embedded main clauses are a direct consequence of their discourse effects
11:30-13:00 Session 13C
11:30
Nevena Klobucar (Ulster University, UK)
Raffaella Folli (Ulster University, UK)
Christina Sevdali (Ulster University, UK)
Juliana Gerard (Ulster University, UK)
The DPBE in English: a pronoun form effect?
12:00
Cherry Chit-Yu Lam (Hong Kong Shue Yan University, UK)
Speaker intention and the evolution of Chinese polar questions
12:30
Adam Chong (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Coppe van Urk (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Minimal words in Atara Imere
14:00-16:00 Session 14A
14:00
Adam Chong (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Variability in “stress deafness” in Singapore English listeners
14:30
Charlotte Hemmings (University of Oxford, UK)
The rise of differential marking in Contemporary Enggano
15:00
Julia Bacskai-Atkari (University of Amsterdam / University of Potsdam, Germany)
Reconsidering the relative cycle: Reanalysis and language contact in Middle English relative clauses
15:30
Lulu Guo (Queen Mary University of London, UK)
Deletion of bare nouns in A-not-A constructions
14:00-16:00 Session 14B
14:00
Ekab Al-Shawashreh (Yarmouk University, Jordan)
Subject pronouns in Jordanian Arabic: A variationist analysis
14:30
Marwan Jarrah (University of Jordan, Jordan)
Sukayan Ali (University of Jordan, Jordan)
The syntax of expressive demonstratives in Jordanian Arabic
15:00
Marwan Jarrah (University of Jordan, Jordan)
A phasal approach to Complementizer agreement in VSO contexts
15:30
Woraprat Manowang (University College London, UK)
Sluicing and focus in Thai
14:00-16:00 Session 14C
14:00
Vicky Chondrogianni (The University of Edinburgh, UK, UK)
Evangelia Daskalaki (University of Alberta, Canada, Canada)
Aretousa Giannakou (University of Nicosia, Cyprus, Cyprus)
Christina Haska (Universidad Adolfo Ibanez, Chile, Chile)
Switching the Majority Language: The case of Heritage Greek in North and South America
16:30-18:00 Session 15: Linguistics Association Lecture by Professor Silvina Montrul (University of Illinois - Urbana Champaigne)

Reverse language transmission, intergenerational attrition and language change

Reverse language transmission, intergenerational attrition and language change Silvina Montrul (University of Illinois - Urbana Champaigne) Some long-term immigrants may undergo native language attrition after several years of residence in the host country. Second generation immigrants, or heritage speakers, are known to display significant structural variability in their grammars in some of the same areas that are vulnerable to subtle attrition effects in long-term immigrants (gender agreement, case marking, verbal morphology, pronominal reference, etc.). Given these two sets of findings, to what extent are these patterns related, and if so, in what way? It has been suggested that because first generation immigrants are the main source of input to the heritage speakers, they may be responsible for directly transmitting attrited patterns or “errors” to the heritage speakers, who then amplify them. This position is consistent with some diachronic models of language transmission. In this talk, I will provide a different interpretation of the relationship between attrition in first generation immigrants and partial acquisition in heritage speakers, based on recent empirical evidence from different languages. I suggest that the linguistic changes observed in the adult immigrants and the heritage speakers may be independent (unrelated) and internally motivated, because they also occur in L2 acquisition. Alternatively, if related, I argue that reverse transmission may be at play instead, when the young adult heritage speakers might be influencing the language of the parents; rather, than the other way around. Bringing together insights from diachronic language change, sociolinguistics and bilingualism, I base my proposal on the purported timing of attrition in adults and partial/protracted acquisition in child heritage speakers as a function of age. Theoretical and empirical evidence for reverse language transmission may explain the emergence of the variety of Spanish spoken in the United States.